wind

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References in classic literature ?
The boat, carried forward by the wind, seemed to be flying in the air.
When she was halfway across the room there came a great shriek from the wind, and the house shook so hard that she lost her footing and sat down suddenly upon the floor.
Tell him that when the wind changes to the West, I'll find his uncle even though he be in China--so long as he is still taking Black Rappee snuff.
At the time the wind began to blow, a ship was sailing far out upon the waters.
The fact was that the fresh wind from the moor had begun to blow the cobwebs out of her young brain and to waken her up a little.
There wasn't much wind at the time, and the heavy, lumbering dugout was slow in getting under way.
How did the vexed wind chafe and roar about its stalwart roof; how did it pant and strive with its wide chimneys, which still poured forth from their hospitable throats, great clouds of smoke, and puffed defiance in its face; how, above all, did it drive and rattle at the casement, emulous to extinguish that cheerful glow, which would not be put down and seemed the brighter for the conflict!
A look in the eyes of a shipmate, a low murmur in the most sheltered spot where the watch on duty are huddled together, a meaning moan from one to the other with a glance at the windward sky, a sigh of weariness, a gesture of disgust passing into the keeping of the great wind, become part and parcel of the gale.
Then the princess thought to betray her as before, and agreed to what she asked: but when the prince went to his chamber he asked the chamberlain why the wind had whistled so in the night.
The wind blew sharply onto Nikita's side and arm where his sheepskin was torn.
There was just the faintest wind from the westward; but it breathed its last by the time we managed to get to leeward of the last lee boat.
Suddenly the water let them down with a brutal bang; and, stranded against the side of the wheelhouse, out of breath and bruised, they were left to stagger up in the wind and hold on where they could.