abridge


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abridge

to reduce the effect of a law, privilege or power.

TO ABRIDGE, practice. To make shorter in words, so as to retain the sense or substance. In law it signifies particularly the making of a declaration or count shorter, by taking or severing away some of the substance from it. Brook, tit. Abridgment; Com. Dig. Abridgment; 1 Vin. Ab. 109.
     2. Abridgment of the Plaint is allowed even after verdict and before judgment (Booth on R. A.) in an cases of real actions where the writ is de lib. ten. generally, as in assize, dower; &c.; because, after the abridgment the writ is still true, it being liberum tenementum still. But it is not allowed in a proecipe quod reddat, demanding a certain number of acres; for this would falsify the writ. See 2 Saund. 44, (n.) 4 ; Bro. Abr. Tit. Abr.; 12 Levin's Ent. 76; 2 Saund. 330; Gilb. C. P. 249-253; Thel. Dig. 76, c. 28, pl. 15, lib. 8.

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Abridge News doesn't use an algorithm; the team hand-picks every piece.
The team plans to launch an Abridge News app (iOS and Android) this fall, a content campaign for the 2018 Midterms and an Abridge News Ambassador's program.
Mr Grace said, 'Both Tom Stoppard and Arnold Wesker saw a production that we did and they were so taken by what they saw that they quickly offered to abridge some Shakespeare plays as a gift.'
Maybe when they no longer receive Sierra magazine in their mailboxes, journalists will understand how campaign finance reform abridges free speech.