Abstraction

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Related to abstract thinking: concrete thinking

Abstraction

Taking from someone with an intent to injure or defraud.

Wrongful abstraction is an unauthorized and illegal withdrawing of funds or an appropriation of someone else's funds for the taker's own benefit. It may be a crime under the laws of a state. It is different from Embezzlement, which is a crime committed only if the taker had a lawful right to possession of the money when it was first taken.

See: concept, generality, idea, impalpability, larceny, notion, preoccupation, vision
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, it can be stated that there were significant differences between the two groups on the means of the five variables (generalization, analytical thinking, logical thinking, abstract thinking and representation).
Seven to 12 years is the concrete operational stage: Children can reason logically and can do some abstract thinking.
But s now you have your very own pocket tester, taking you through a 45-minute session of under-pressure Q&As that assess characteristics such as comprehension, linguistic ability, abstract thinking and spatial judgement.
This part of school curriculum demands abstract thinking and frequently exceeds the students' cognitive powers.
Lying requires a brain complex enough for abstract thinking.
This is how they develop skills like empathy and abstract thinking.
Executive cognitive functions are those brain functions related to planning, initiating appropriate actions, abstract thinking and, in general, the abilities needed for everyday, independent living.
Describing narrative fiction as a simulation of social experience, Mar contends that readers are experiencing the world and developing the skills of empathy and abstract thinking that a civil society demands.
The author encourages abstract thinking through exercises informed by real-world scenarios to help students access and master algorithm concepts, including proofs of correctness, with greater ease.
In other words, they know that adding or subtracting one object from a group makes a difference, but have no linguistic way to keep track of accumulating quantities, which requires abstract thinking.
The information in the task got through to girls' language areas of the brain--those associated with abstract thinking through language--and their performance correlated accuracy with the degree of activation in some of these zones.
The SILS is based on clinical and research findings suggesting that intellectual impairment differentially affects various cognitive abilities--vocabulary has proven relatively resistant to change, whereas abstract thinking has been shown to be more susceptible to cognitive deterioration (Shipley 1939).