abstract

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Abstract

To take or withdraw from; as, to abstract the funds of a bank. To remove or separate. To summarize or abridge.

An abstract comprises—or concentrates in itself—the essential qualities of a larger thing—or of several things—in a short, abbreviated form. It differs from a transcript, which is a verbatim copy of the thing itself and is more comprehensive.

Cross-references

Abstract of Title.

abstract

n. in general, a summary of a record or document, such as an abstract of judgment or abstract of title to real property.

abstract

noun abbreviation, abbreviature, analect, brief, capsule, compendium, compilation, compression, condensation, consolidation, conspectus, contraction, digest, epitoma, epitome, extract, pandect, precis, reduction, summary, synopsis
Associated concepts: abstract idea, abstract of a record, abbtract of judgment, abstract of title, abstract proposition of law, abstracts of evidence, marketable title acts, title search

abstract

(Separate), verb detach, disengage, disjoin, dissociate, disunite, isolate, remove, take out of context

abstract

(Summarize), verb abbreviate, abridge, capsulize, compact, compress, condense, contract, reduce, shorten, synopsize, telescope
See also: abridgment, capsule, compendium, condense, delineation, digest, extract, hold up, intangible, lessen, moot, note, outline, recondite, restatement, review, rob, scenario, select, speculative, steal, summary, synopsis, theoretical, withdraw
References in periodicals archive ?
The CLA says the current system does not help abstracters to trade water effectively, nor does it provide an incentive for abstracters to manage water efficiently.
One can depend on the abstracts included in RILM, since the abstracts are written either by the author or by volunteer abstracters trained in musicology (frequently music librarians), but there is no mention as to who is abstracting for IIMP.
One reason the issue has not been sufficiently scrutinized is that most of the people involved in hypertext were not, at least until recently, librarians or related information professionals, such as indexers and abstracters.
The American Land Title Association, founded in 1907, is the national trade association representing nearly 4,200 title insurance companies, title agents, independent abstracters, title searchers, and attorneys.
This approach can result in "snowballing" data collection costs as abstracters go from office to office to find the required charts.
Introduction to Indexing and Abstracting concludes with a list of 99 Web resources for indexers and abstracters and a chapter titled "The Profession," which gives pointers for getting started as an indexer.