abstract

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Abstract

To take or withdraw from; as, to abstract the funds of a bank. To remove or separate. To summarize or abridge.

An abstract comprises—or concentrates in itself—the essential qualities of a larger thing—or of several things—in a short, abbreviated form. It differs from a transcript, which is a verbatim copy of the thing itself and is more comprehensive.

Cross-references

Abstract of Title.

abstract

n. in general, a summary of a record or document, such as an abstract of judgment or abstract of title to real property.

abstract

noun abbreviation, abbreviature, analect, brief, capsule, compendium, compilation, compression, condensation, consolidation, conspectus, contraction, digest, epitoma, epitome, extract, pandect, precis, reduction, summary, synopsis
Associated concepts: abstract idea, abstract of a record, abbtract of judgment, abstract of title, abstract proposition of law, abstracts of evidence, marketable title acts, title search

abstract

(Separate), verb detach, disengage, disjoin, dissociate, disunite, isolate, remove, take out of context

abstract

(Summarize), verb abbreviate, abridge, capsulize, compact, compress, condense, contract, reduce, shorten, synopsize, telescope
See also: abridgment, capsule, compendium, condense, delineation, digest, extract, hold up, intangible, lessen, moot, note, outline, recondite, restatement, review, rob, scenario, select, speculative, steal, summary, synopsis, theoretical, withdraw
References in periodicals archive ?
Short (five-minute) video abstracts allow authors to present their research in person to the reader.
For clinical practice abstracts, the following sections are required: Purpose, Review of Literature, Summary (of the innovation or practice), and implications for Registered Nurses or Advanced Practice Registered Nurses.
Deadlines for abstract submissions vary by APHA group, but fall between Feb.
All abstracts must be submitted electronically in alignment with the guidelines provided.
Many organizations will also provide you with the criteria on which the research abstracts will be evaluated.
The sorry state of abstracts was an impetus to the CONSORT group to publish, in 2008, a guideline for abstracts for randomized trials.
As already noted, abstracts allow readers access to a relatively quick review of a large number of articles.
A committee of approximately 160 to 170 abstract reviewers could rate all conference abstracts within one month and might be willing to review a larger number of abstracts than previously if the experience was perceived as more professionally rewarding.
These abstracts are inconvenient in that, by not including a detailed presentation of the results, it is necessary to have access to the complete article to learn of such; they may present the results via a phrase synthesizing them, without contributing numerical or statistical data.
The idea of submitting an abstract for Congress can be intimidating and many questions about the process and structure may arise.
You are invited to submit an abstract to be considered for a poster presentation at the 36th annual National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition, May 16-21, 2009 in New Orleans, La.
There would be no pressure to look through any particular list of new articles or other Web pages (unless an expert or team agreed, for example, to scan the titles and abstracts of all new articles coming out in certain journals, or to moderate a calendar of events).