accent

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There was something more plaintive than these words, and that was the accent in which they were uttered.
All these noises deepened and became substantial to the listener's ear, till she could distinguish every soft and dreamy accent of the love songs that died causelessly into funeral hymns.
I looked up in amazement; the voice was a voice of Albion; the accent was pure and silvery ; it only wanted firmness, and assurance, to be the counterpart of what any well-educated lady in Essex or Middlesex might have enounced, yet the speaker or reader was no other than Mdlle.
Descended from old New England stock, his father a consul-general, he had been born in Germany, in which country he had received his early education and his accent.
Apparently I was carrying forward an attack on French at the same time, for I distinctly recall my failure to enlist with me an old gentleman who had once lived a long time in France, and whom I hoped to get at least an accent from.
She had a French master, who complimented her upon the purity of her accent and her facility of learning; the fact is she had learned long ago and grounded herself subsequently in the grammar so as to be able to teach it to George; and Madam Strumpff came to give her lessons in singing, which she performed so well and with such a true voice that the Major's windows, who had lodgings opposite under the Prime Minister, were always open to hear the lesson.
cried the voice, with a sudden increase of Scotch accent, testifying to a friendlier feeling.
Wholly inattentive to her sister's feelings, Lydia flew about the house in restless ecstasy, calling for every one's congratulations, and laughing and talking with more violence than ever; whilst the luckless Kitty continued in the parlour repined at her fate in terms as unreasonable as her accent was peevish.
Say monsieur, and speak quickly," replied the unknown, with that haughty accent which admits of neither discussion nor reply.
said the newly arrived general speaking quickly with a harsh German accent, looking to both sides and advancing straight toward the inner door.
It was not raised to any high pitch; its accent was the accent of prayer, and the words it uttered were these:
On perceiving me, the stranger addressed me in English, although with a foreign accent.