accession


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Accession

Coming into possession of a right or office; increase; augmentation; addition.

The right to all that one's own property produces, whether that property be movable or immovable; and the right to that which is united to it by accession, either naturally or artificially. The right to own things that become a part of something already owned.

A principle derived from the Civil Law, by which the owner of property becomes entitled to all that it produces, and to all that is added or united to it, either naturally or artificially (that is, by the labor or skill of another) even where such addition extends to a change of form or materials; and by which, on the other hand, the possessor of property becomes entitled to it, as against the original owner, where the addition made to it by skill and labor is of greater value than the property itself, or where the change effected in its form is so great as to render it impossible to restore it to its original shape.

Generally, accession signifies acquisition of title to Personal Property by bestowing labor on it that converts it into an entirely different thing or by incorporation of property into a union with other property.

The commencement or inauguration of a sovereign's reign.

For example, a person who owns property along a river also takes ownership of any additional land that builds up along the riverbank. This right may extend to additions that result from the work or skill of another person. The buyer of a car who fails to make scheduled payments cannot get back his new spark plugs after the car is repossessed because they have become a part of the whole car. The principle of accession does not necessarily apply, however, where the addition has substantially improved the value and changed the character of the property, as when by mistake someone else's grapes were made into wine or someone else's clay made into bricks. In such cases, the original owner might recover only the value of the raw material rather than take ownership of the finished product.

In the context of a treaty, accession may be gained in either of two ways: (1) the new member nation may be formally accepted by all the nations already parties to the treaty; or (2) the new nation may simply bind itself to the obligations already existing in the treaty. Frequently, a treaty will expressly provide that certain nations or categories of nations may accede. In some cases, the parties to a treaty will invite one or more nations to accede to the treaty.

accession

(Annexation), noun accessio, addition, adherence, adhesion, adjoining, affixation, annexing, appendage, attachment, binding, cementation, cohesion, combination, combining, conjoining, consolidation, fastening, fusion, inclusion, incorporation, joining, merger, putting together, securing, subjoining, subjunction, supplementation, unification, union, uniting
Associated concepts: accession of fixtures, accession of property

accession

(Enlargement), noun accretion, accrual, accumulation, acquisition, addition, advance, amplification, appreciation, attainment, broadening, burgeoning, development, elaboration, enhancement, expansion, extension, gain, growth, multiplication, progress, progression, swelling
Associated concepts: accession of property, accretion, accuisition of title by accession, doctrine of accession, perranent accession, riparian accession
See also: acceptance, accumulation, acknowledgment, acquiescence, addition, appurtenance, arrogation, collection, cumulation, receipt

accession

1 a doctrine of English law by which a person is held to be responsible for a crime even although he is not the principal actor. An accessory before the fact is someone who procures, counsels, commands or abets it. An accessory after the fact assists the principal by harbouring him or assisting him to get away. A person who actually is present but does not commit the act is not an accessory but a principal in the second degree. Accession after the fact is not generally accepted in Scotland, although it has been imposed by statute in cases of TREASON.
2 the doctrine of the Roman and Scots law of property that declares that the owner of a thing becomes the owner of any subsidiary thing that becomes attached to it. A door stuck to a house becomes the property of the house owner.
3 succeeding to the throne as monarch.

See also ACCESSION AGREEMENTS.

ACCESSION, property. The ownership of a thing, whether it be real or personal, movable or immovable, carries with it the right to all that the thing produces, and to all that becomes united to it, either naturally or artificially; this is called the right of accession.
     2.-1. The doctrine of property arising from accession, is grounded on the right of occupancy.
     3.-2. The original owner of any thing which receives an accession by natural or artificial means, as by the growth of vegetables, the pregnancy of animals; Louis. Code, art. 491; the embroidering of cloth, or the conversion of wood or metal into vessels or utensils, is entitled to his right of possession to the property of it, under such its state of improvement; 5 H. 7, 15; 12 H. 8, 10; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 23; Moor, 20; Poph. 88. But the owner must be able to prove the identity of the original materials; for if wine, oil, or bread, be made out of another man's grapes, olives, or wheat, they belong to the new operator, who is bound to make satisfaction to the former proprietor for the materials which he has so converted. 2 Bl. Com. 404; 5 Johns. Rep. 348; Betts v. Lee, 6 Johns. Rep. 169; Curtiss v. Groat, 10 Johns. 288; Babcock v. Gill, 9 Johns. Rep. 363; Chandler v. Edson, 5 H. 7, 15; 12 H. 8, 10; Fits. Abr. Bar. 144; Bro. Abr. Property, 23; Doddridge Eng. Lawyer, 125, 126, 132, 134. See Adjunction; Confusion of Goods. See Generally, Louis. Code, tit. 2, c. 2 and 3.

ACCESSION, international law, is the absolute or conditional acceptance by one or several states, of a treaty already concluded between one or several states, of a treaty already concluded between other sovereignties. Merl. Rep. mot Accession.

References in periodicals archive ?
Latvia's accession will help the country to improve its reputation, said Latvian Prime Minister Maris Kucinskis in an interview with the Latvian public television LTV on Tuesday April 19.
The draft Accession Package, spelling out Kazakhstan's terms of WTO membership, contains:
Accession of the state of Palestine to the Vienna convention on the law of
The coordinating role of the Chief Negotiator is essential, and his ability to influence is visible in the final phase of the negotiations and drafting of the Accession Treaty (11).
All data were analyzed by ANOVA using SPSS 13.0 software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA), and then LSD method was used to detect possible differences among the accessions. Asterisk symbols above the columns in the figures indicate significant differences at P < 0.05 (Student's 1-test).
The plan is based on reviewing about 10 laws and amending them to comply with conventions and requirements of the accession in order to enhance the investment environment and ensure the investments inflow to Yemen.
The accession, AC-05 had larger seeds as well as higher seed breadth and cotyledon thickness than other studied accessions in both years.
Lastly, MEPs called on Croatia to share its valuable accession experience with other countries in the region and to play an active role in the stabilisation and European integration process of the Western Balkans.
The EU is still struggling with the fall-out from the accession of Romania and Bulgaria in 2007.
Presenting the annual Enlargement Package, Commissioner Stefan Fuele said that "our recommendations place the rule of law firmly at the centre of the accession process".
(5) Universal membership by this definition requires 25 further states to complete accession negotiations that are already underway, and a further 14 states to commence the process.
Announcing the abrogation of Jammu and Kashmir's special status, BJP leader Amit Shah referred to this Instrument of Accession.