actus reus


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Actus Reus

[Latin, Guilty act.] As an element of criminal responsibility, the wrongful act or omission that comprises the physical components of a crime. Criminal statutes generally require proof of both actus reus and mens rea on the part of a defendant in order to establish criminal liability.

actus reus

noun actions, at fault, bearing, behavior, blamable, blameworthy, censurable, chargeable, criminal, criminous, culpable, demeanor, deserving, deserving of blame, deserving reproof, erring, external element of a crime, guilty act, immutable, in error, in the wrong, incriminated, indictable, manners, mien, observance, of punishment, pattern, peccant, reprehensible, reproachable, reprovable, to blame

actus reus

see CRIME.
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21: "Rule 77(A)(iv) gives a list of possible actus reus of the offence of contempt of court as follows: threat, intimidation, causing of injury, offering of a bribe and otherwise interfering with a witness or a potential witness.
Asimismo, califico estos actos como actus reus genocida en virtud del articulo II (b) de la Convencion.
39) The Supreme Court was thus forced to determine whether the mens rea of the supervisors could be combined with the actus reus of the vice president for the purposes of determining the hospital's USERRA liability.
187) Rather, criminal law's traditional actus reus requirement expresses "the feeling that the individual thinking evil thoughts must be protected from a state which may class him as a threat to its security.
When we avoid the error of assuming that actus reus and mens rea
Element analysis exposes the flaw: An offense with a strict-liability element still has an actus reus element with a mental element of knowledge or intent.
First Amendment concerns are factored into the calculus, hate speech tethered to a widespread or systematic attack ought to satisfy the CAH actus reus requirement.
Under English common law, an "attempt" crime occurs when the defendant embarks on the action for a crime but fails to commit the actus reus for the offence.
Moreover, when consent or agreement is not communicated, the absence of consent as an element of the actus reus of sexual assault is to be inferred and is thus proven.
The problem of underinclusiveness, as both courts and policymakers have emphasized, stems from the stringent actus reus requirements aimed to decrease the probability of wrongful convictions.
With regard to the intent required to prove aiding and abetting liability under the ATS, the Court holds that knowledge that these acts assist the commission of the offense is the appropriate mens rea and the actus reus consists of practical assistance, encouragement, or moral support which has a substantial effect on the perpetration of the crime.
Richards examines how the proposed account of the moral foundations of the criminal law may be deployed in clarifying the substantive criminal law and cognate constitutional law doctrines, discussing seriatim the contribution this theory can make to understanding (a) decriminalization and the limits of the criminal sanction, (b) actus reus and the distinction between actions and omissions, (c) mensrea and excuses, including the novel idea of an excuse of socioeconomic deprivation, (d) legality, (e) the nature and place of justification, notably self-defense and necessity, (f) vexed issues relating to inchoate crimes, in particular, attempts, and (g) proportionality and the death penalty.