adjustment

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adjustment

noun abatement of differences, accommodatio, accommodation, accord, accordance, adaptation, agreement, arrangement, attunement, bargain, binding agreement, coaptation, compact, composition, concurrence, conformance, conformation, congruence, congruity, consistency, contract, correction, covenant, disposition, harmony, mutual concession, mutual understanding, negotiation, pact, reconciliation, rectification, regulating, stipulation, terms, understanding, uniformity
Associated concepts: adjusted basis, adjusted reserves, addustment of contracts, adjustment of loss, adjustments in wills
See also: accord, accordance, agreement, amendment, arbitration, arrangement, change, collection, collective bargaining, compact, compatibility, compromise, conciliation, conformity, correction, determination, disposition, expiation, habituation, indemnification, justification, management, mediation, mitigation, modification, order, payment, reconciliation, regulation, rehabilitation, repair, reparation, restitution, settlement, treatment, understanding

adjustment

1 the computation of the amount due to an insured and the fixing of the proportion to be borne by the underwriters.
2 in Scottish civil procedure, the changing of the writ or defences before the record is closed.

See also ADJUSTMENT OF PRIOR TRANSACTIONS.

ADJUSTMENT, maritime law. The adjustment of a loss is the settling and ascertaining the amount of the indemnity which the insured after all proper allowances and deductions have been made, is entitled to receive, and the proportion of this, which each underwriter is liable to pay, under the policy Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 14, p. 617 or it is a written admission of the amounts of the loss as settled between the parties to a policy of insurance. 3 Stark. Ev. 1167, 8.
     2. In adjusting a loss, the first thing to be considered is, how the quantity of damages for which the underwriters are liable, shall be ascertained. When a loss is a total loss, and the insured decides to abandon, he must give notice of this to the underwriters iii a reasonable time, otherwise he will waive his right to abandon, and must be content to claim only for a partial loss. Marsh. Ins. B.1, c.3, s.2; 15 East, 559; 1 T. R. 608; 9 East, 283; 13 East 304; 6 Taunt. 383. When the loss is admitted to be total, and the policy is a valued one, the insured is entitled to receive the whole sum insured, subject to such deductions as may have been agreed by the policy to be made in case of loss.
     3. The quantity of damages being known, the next point to be settled, is, by what rule this shall be estimated. The price of a thing does not afford a just criterion to ascertain its true value. It may have been bought very dear or very cheap. The circumstances of time and place cause a continual variation in the price of things. For this reason, in cases of general average, the things saved contribute not according to prune cost, but according to the price for which they may be sold at the time of settling the average. Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 14, s. 2, p. 621; Laws of Wisbury, art. 20 Laws of Oleron, art. 8 this Dict. tit. Price. And see 4 Dall. 430; 1 Caines' R. 80; 2 S. & R. 229 2 S.& R. 257, 258.
     4. An adjustment being endorsed on the policy, and signed by the underwriters, with the promise to pay in a given time, is prima facie evidence against them, and amounts to an admission of all the facts necessary to be proved by the insured to entitle him to recover in an action on the policy. It is like a note of hand, and being proved, the insured has no occasion to go into proof of any other circumstances. Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 14, s. 3, p. 632; 3 Stark. Ev. 1167, 8 Park. ch. 4; Wesk. Ins, 8; Beaw. Lex. Mer. 310; Com. Dig. Merchant, E 9; Abbott on Shipp. 346 to 348. See Damages.

References in periodicals archive ?
Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents.
As reflected in these data, practitioners were less inclined to use insight-facilitation skills with clients diagnosed with schizophrenia; cognitive skills were used more for adjustment disorders than for either mood or anxiety disorders; behavioral skills were used more significantly with clients diagnosed with substance abuse than with those diagnosed with schizophrenia; and supportive skills (working alliance) were used more with those diagnosed with substance abuse than with those diagnosed with schizophrenia, mood, and anxiety disorders.
DSM-IV-TR Prevalence of Mood, Psychotic, Adjustment, and Childhood Disorder Diagnoses According to Gender Disorder Prevalence Bipolar I disorder F = M Bipolar II disorder F > M Major depressive disorder F > M Dysthymic disorder F > M Schizophrenia M > F Adjustment disorder F > M Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder M > F Conduct disorder M > F Oppositional defiant disorder M > F Substance-related disorder M > F F denotes female; M denotes male.
The length of treatment for females also appears to be longer for anxiety disorders (18 additional days), adjustment disorders (45 additional days) and other illnesses.
Gonzalez, who works for Community Healthlink, said bereavement over the loss of a friend or family member is often the catalyst for depression resulting from adjustment disorder.
The psychiatric diagnosis of adjustment disorder is, however, still the commonest diagnosis encountered in the context of chronic illness in adolescence.
Under court-ordered psychiatric examinations, the student was diagnosed as showing signs of adjustment disorder stemming from unmanageable stress caused by his mother.
They may be told by someone who lacks expertise they are experiencing an adjustment disorder, and just need more sleep.
Major Depressive Disorder/Generalized Anxiety Disorder or Adjustment Disorder with Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood: Janet's previous sadness, concentration problems, decreased pleasure in regular activities, and sleep disturbances suggest a major depressive episode.
A client with a very mild case of adjustment disorder clearly cannot be expected to have the same outcome as a client with severe major depression.
Nine women (45%) met criteria for a clinical psychiatric (Axis I) disorder but were in full remission from prior Axis I disorders including adjustment disorder, major depression, dysthymic disorder, panic disorder, and depressive disorder not otherwise specified.
Lichtenberg: Among community samples the prevalence of major depression is about 1%, but an additional 15% have minor depression or adjustment disorder.