adulate

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Related to adulator: egotist

adulate

verb acclaim, admire, applaud, approbate, approve, celebrate, commend, compliment, eulogize, exalt, express, extol, flatter, glorify, idolize, laud, lionize, overpraise, pay tribute to, praise, salute
See also: overestimate
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When we examine the historical content in Handel's Alessandro, we find a parade of remarkable characters from the past: Cleone adulator, the beautiful Roxana, noble Cleitus and, above all, Alexander the Great.
destruction of the countryside and urban environment, responsibility for the anthropological degradation of Italians"--meaning the ruin of their culture--and "the corrupt distribution of civic positions to adulators.
Because of these adulators, the merits of the others as the giants they may be are taken as pygmies.
I am sure he is a much better and a much bigger man than some of his adulators contemplate.
So if some of the illusions of the black wunderkind's adulators have been shattered and everybody has been returned to the real world - they had better make their decision at the ballot box in a realistic way.
No surprise, since the Gorby adulators in the media have done everything possible to ignore it.
Ali the adulators who conspire to transform the false into the true, and all the satirists bartering and squandering their skills in order to transform the true into the false, lose equally their design, WHAT IS, IS; AND WHAT IS NOT, IS NOT.
What the church needs today are not adulators to extol the status quo, but men whose humility and obedience are not less than their passion for the truth: men who face every misunderstanding and attack as they bear witness; who, in a word, love the church more than ease and the unruffled course of their personal destiny.
As a young German theologian named Joseph Ratzinger put it in 1962: "What the church needs today are not adulators to extol the status quo, but men whose humility and obedience are not less than their passion for the truth: men who face every misunderstanding and attack as they bear witness; men who, in a word, love the church more than ease and the unruffled course of their personal destiny.
It is the view to which the adulators of the Common Law have subscribed for centuries, namely that time and space lose their relevance in the Common Law's world of timeless and spaceless Reason.
In 1960 Bentley was already reminding adulators that "Bertolt Brecht spent quite a lot of energy trying to pull [pedestals] down.