affix

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affix

v. 1) to attach something to real estate in a permanent way, including planting trees and shrubs, constructing a building, or adding to existing improvements. The key is that affixed items are permanent and cannot be picked up and moved away like a washing machine. 2) to sign or seal, as affix a signature or a seal.

affix

verb add, adfigere, adhere, adjoin, adligare, agglutinate, annex, append, attach, bind, cohere, combine, conjoin, connect, couple, enclose, fasten, fix, insert, join, link, put together, secure, subjoin, supplement, unite
Associated concepts: affix a seal to an instrument, affix a signature, affix exhibits to a pleading, affix process to the door
See also: add, addendum, adhere, allonge, annex, append, attach, cement, cohere, combine, join, levy, rider
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, no affixal adjective has been found in the corpus that displays the following lexical functions: OF('X') 'origin', FOR('X') 'purpose', WITH('X') 'possession', POSS('X') 'possible', PL('X') 'plural', SING('X') 'singular', NEG('X') 'negation', POS('X') 'positive' and AUGM('X') 'augmentative'.
In fact, in <-na>, /n/ occurs in the onset position of an affixal string followed by a vowel which fills the nucleus position.
Tottie further distinguishes between non-affixal and affixal negation.
The possibility of coordinating affixal derivatives in English is noted by Plag (2003: 84), who mentions such combinations as de- and recolonization or over- and underdetermination.
Structural and Junctional aspects of morphological recursivity: Old English affixal adjectives.
Murk's analysis in which the syllable structure of the actual stem of a genitive or partitive form conditions affixal allomorphy.
AFFIXAL NEGATION AS A GRAMMATICALIZATION OF THE LEXICON
As morpheme order studies have shown, English irregular past forms are acquired before affixal morphemes both by L1 learners (Brown, 1973) and by EFL learners (Krashen, 1978; Lazaro Ibarrola, 2002).
The aim of this journal article is to carry out a complete analysis of the category, status and patterns of the bases of derivation of Old English affixal nouns.
However, even Nichols (1986: 87), whose principle of "Headward Migration" posits a one-way path of development in the movement of affixal morphology from dependent to head, allows that "[r]eversal of the headward-migration principle can only occur because of boundaryshifts.
In Indo-European languages, classes are predominantly marked by affixal variation, while inflectional stems tend to be relatively constant.
The productivity of the verbal predicates is analyzed in terms of their combinatorial possibilities with prefixes, which in this work are considered affixal predicates, as postulated by Mairal and Cortes (2002).