affix

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affix

v. 1) to attach something to real estate in a permanent way, including planting trees and shrubs, constructing a building, or adding to existing improvements. The key is that affixed items are permanent and cannot be picked up and moved away like a washing machine. 2) to sign or seal, as affix a signature or a seal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bearing in mind the correlation between frequency and transparency demonstrated by Bell and Schafer (2016), a complex word, specifically in the case under study, a complex word with multiple derivational affixation, will be perceived as less transparent the lower the type frequency of the affixal chain.
A total semantic match is higher when affixation is pleonastic, because expectedness creates semantic transparency.
Results of the acceptability judgment task indicate that, at the level of reception, a combination of four heterocategorial derivational suffixes and a chain of pleonastic affixation in a complex word tend not to be accepted by Portuguese native speakers.
Non-frequent/created evaluative words and frequent evaluative words are characterized by evaluative affixation. Non-frequent/created evaluative words present pleonastic affixation, that is, the occurrence of suffixes operating in the same pattern, specifically, the evaluative-diminutive pattern.
This is because pleonastic affixation, such as the evaluative one, leads to semantic expectedness in the hearer that enables him/her to identify the meaning of the word, even in relation to non--frequent words, which is in accordance with prediction 2.
This is because even in non--frequent words, the evaluative affixation was recognized, which permitted an identification of the word, even with changes to its structures.
The presence of pleonastic affixation reveals a prediction effect, because the meaning of each of the identified morphemes enables the prediction of the same meaning in the other morphemes, as long as they actualize the same pattern.
This is due to the unexpectedness of the combination of those morphemes, because the combination is not frequent and lacks pleonastic affixation. This shows that affixal salience (Laudanna and Burani 1995) also depends on the expectedness of the affixal combination.
For the same reasons, partial change in syllables may be semantically indifferent in evaluative words, because these have pleonastic affixation. This is not so in heterocategorial suffixation, where a change in the syllable has semantic consequences or leads to the production of an impossible word (*contabilizalidade instead of contabilizabilidade; *materiazabilidade instead of materializabilidade).