number

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Related to algebraic number: Algebraic number field, Algebraic number theory

number

noun account, accounting, aggregate, collection, complement, count, decimal, degree, estimate, exponent, figure, integer, integral, multitude, overall amount, overall quantity, quantity, score, sum, tally, total
Associated concepts: gaming
See also: amount, calculate, comprise, contain, enumerate, itemize, quantity, quota

INDEFINITE, NUMBER. A number which may be increased or diminished at pleasure.
     2. When a corporation is composed of an indefinite number of persons, any number of them consisting of a majority of those present may do any act unless it be otherwise regulated by the charter or by-laws. See Definite number.

NUMBER. A collection of units.
     2. In pleading, numbers must be stated truly, when alleged in the recital of a record, written instrument, or express contract. Lawes' PI. 48; 4 T. R. 314; Cro. Car. 262; Dougl. 669; 2 Bl. Rep. 1104. But in other cases, it is not in general requisite that they should be truly stated, because they are not required to be strictly proved. If, for example, in an action of trespass the plaintiff proves the wrongful taking away of any part of the goods duly described in his declaration, he is entitled to recover pro tanto. Bac. Ab. Trespass, I 2 Lawes' PI. 48.
     3. And sometimes, when the subject to be described is supposed to comprehend a multiplicity of particulars, a general description is sufficient. A declaration in trover alleging the conversion of "a library of books"' without stating their number, titles, or quality, was held 'to be sufficiently certain; 3 Bulst. 31; Carth. 110; Bac. Ab. Trover, F 1; and in an action for the loss of goods, by burning the plaintiff's house, the articles may be described by the simple denomination of "goods" or "divers goods." 1 Keb. 825; Plowd. 85, 118, 123; Cro. Eliz. 837; 1 H. Bl. 284.

References in periodicals archive ?
2] are distinct algebraic numbers conjugate over Q then
Although our model is very general and allows to compute a large set of numbers, some algebraic numbers as "simple" (on a computational point of view) as 1/5 are not computable.
i) The usual definition is more general, the coefficients of S can be taken in an arbitrary algebraic number field.
Those irrational numbers that cannot serve as solutions are called transcendental numbers (from Latin words meaning "to climb beyond," since they climb beyond the algebraic numbers to further heights).
Pollack introduces algebraic number theory to readers who are familiar with linear algebra, commutative ring theory, Galois theory, a little abelian groups theory, and elementary number theory up to and including the law of quadratic reciprocity.
Furuta, The genus field and genus number in algebraic number fields, Nagoya Math.
For example, he describes how Fermat's last theorem, first posited in the year 1630, remained unsolved until Andrew Wiles published his solution in 1995 while also explaining how work on Fermat's theorem led to the development of algebraic number theory and complex analysis.
This mathematics textbook for graduate students covers the fundamentals of abstract algebra including fields and Galois theory, algebraic number theory, algebraic geometry and groups, rings and modules.
In this paper, we study the remaining parts, namely, we give such bounds for modular forms with Fourier coefficients in an arbitrary algebraic number field K and for any prime ideal p in K.
Other topics are rational points on elliptic curves, conics and the p-adic numbers, the zeta function, and algebraic number theory.
After a fine introduction to basic notions, he covers unique factorization, the Gaussian integers, and Pell's equation, and moves on to algebraic number theory.
Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat's Last Theorem, 4th Edition

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