alibi


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alibi

n. an excuse used by a person accused or suspected of crime. In the original Latin it means "in another place" which has to be the ultimate alibi.

alibi

‘elsewhere’, the defence in a criminal trial in the UK (and, indeed, the USA) that the accused was somewhere else at the time the alleged crime was committed. In both England and Scotland, the defence must give the prosecution notice of such a defence.

ALIBI, in evidence. This is a Latin word which signifies, elsewhere.
     2. When a person, charged with a crime, proves (se eadem die fuisse alibi,) that he was, at the time alleged, in a different place from that in which it was committed, he is said to prove an alibi, the effect of which is to lay a foundation for the necessary inference, that he could not have committed it. See Bract. fo. 140, lib. 3, cap. 20, De Corona.
     3. This proof is usually made out by the testimony of witnesses, but it is presumed it might be made out by writings; as if the party could prove by a record properly authenticated, that on the day or at the time in question, he was in another place.
     4. It must be admitted that mere alibi evidence lies under a great and general prejudice, and ought to be heard with uncommon caution; but if it appear, to be founded in truth, it is the best negative evidence that can be offered; it is really positive evidence, which in the nature of things necessarily implies a negative; and in many cases it is the only evidence which an innocent man can offer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Cristina Gutierrez, failed to contact the potential alibi witness, Asia McClain.
14/ Ian Beale MOTIVE: Lucy dumped him on Good Friday ALIBI: In the house with daughter Abi at the time.
"The Alibi line is clearly one of the most exciting solutions we've ever offered," Norman continued.
Implicit personality theory (Ashmore, Griffo, & Green, 2007; Schneider, 1973) could support either positive or negative views of suspects with salacious alibis. An evaluator who attributes the alibi admission to honesty would likely have several positive views of the suspect (e.g., honest in the face of pressure to be dishonest).
Mr Ellison said: "There's not been a breath uttered until today that you were in a position to give your son an alibi." She answered: "My son would have been at home."
Try to be as detailed as you possibly can."), participants were asked several cued recall questions regarding their alibi (e.g., "Do you remember where everyone was sitting in relation to one another?").
In a similar fashion, Weir argues, Tolstoy avails himself of the alibi of narrative to enable him to manipulate authorial identity and assert authorial control of final interpretation of meaning in his works.
Alibi hosts a weekly event dubbed "Tuesday Tastings." The bar doesn't have its own kitchen, so bar bites come from Scampo, an Italian restaurant also on the first floor of the hotel.
However, prosecutors argued the alibi shouldn't be used in the defence because his family "would surely vouch for him," heard the court.
In a new plea deal in Lane County Circuit Court, Jordan Scott Merrell, 26, admitted late last month that his alibi claim was untrue, according to court records.
A source inside M3 said: "There are serious questions around Murat's alibi. He says he was at his mum's house and did not learn of Madeleine's disappearance until the following morning.
In a notorious after-hours joint called the Alibi Club a man named Philip Stilwell dies in a sex game gone wrong.