alibi


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alibi

n. an excuse used by a person accused or suspected of crime. In the original Latin it means "in another place" which has to be the ultimate alibi.

alibi

noun corroborative excuse, declaration, defense, defensive evidence, defensive plea, exculpatory excuse, explanation, justifiable excuse, justification, justificaaory excuse, plausible excuse, plea in being elsewhere, proof of absence, verifiable excuse, verificative excuse
Associated concepts: affirmative defense, notice of intention to introduce alibi defense, traverse of indictment
See also: compurgation, excuse, pretext

alibi

‘elsewhere’, the defence in a criminal trial in the UK (and, indeed, the USA) that the accused was somewhere else at the time the alleged crime was committed. In both England and Scotland, the defence must give the prosecution notice of such a defence.

ALIBI, in evidence. This is a Latin word which signifies, elsewhere.
     2. When a person, charged with a crime, proves (se eadem die fuisse alibi,) that he was, at the time alleged, in a different place from that in which it was committed, he is said to prove an alibi, the effect of which is to lay a foundation for the necessary inference, that he could not have committed it. See Bract. fo. 140, lib. 3, cap. 20, De Corona.
     3. This proof is usually made out by the testimony of witnesses, but it is presumed it might be made out by writings; as if the party could prove by a record properly authenticated, that on the day or at the time in question, he was in another place.
     4. It must be admitted that mere alibi evidence lies under a great and general prejudice, and ought to be heard with uncommon caution; but if it appear, to be founded in truth, it is the best negative evidence that can be offered; it is really positive evidence, which in the nature of things necessarily implies a negative; and in many cases it is the only evidence which an innocent man can offer.

References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of surface traits on alibi believability remains to be explored.
The univariate results revealed that, as predicted, individuals who were warned that they would have to give their alibi used positive qualifiers at a higher rate (M = .
The opening chapter of Part II of Weir's study digresses somewhat from the notion of narrative as alibi in order to address how Tolstoy "mediates his authorial self" (53).
In the summertime, Alibi has hosted dog-friendly events on the patio, which features an outdoor bar and seating for 160 people.
If there had been an alibi defense, we would have presented one," Halpern said this week.
Murat is claimed to have dramatically changed his alibi in a police investigation before he was declared an official suspect.
As with Best Alibi, a drop back in trip is on the cards for Heliostatic, who made a lot of the running before being headed by the winner and fading to finish seventh.
Pledger was apparently the only person other than Dodds who was able to testify to his alibi, making her testimony material, not cumulative, and not susceptible of proof by other means,'' Zelon wrote.
I've ridden Best Alibi before and the Godolphin horse and they are fair animals.
Mel Hooker, chief of the human resources management service at the Albuquerque VA, wrote Berg back on November 9 and acknowledged that "your personal computer files did not contain the editorial letter written to the editor of the weekly Alibi.
But sooner or later someone will have to write a real history and undertake a real analysis, stripping away the flattering alibis to reveal just how many clothes the emperor really wears.
Ian Huntley conspired with Maxine Carr to create an alibi for the time of the girls' death to "put the police off the scent", the Old Bailey was told yesterday.