aloof

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I tire of hearing how counselors work developmentally, whereas social workers are administrators or case managers and psychologists cling to a medical model that dictates they do testing and relate aloofly to patients.
Because you may be coming across more aloofly and self contained than you really feel.
Despised by "nearly everyone in River Heights" as "snobbish and arrogant" (3), the Tophams are full of false airs, revealed through their gauche personal style; their large house "seem[s] to look down rather aloofly upon the surrounding homes" in its over-landscaped yard crowded with "sundials, benches, bird houses, and statues.
They look aloofly down at you, superior sneers telling you no, chum, this ain't for you.
Much as Paul Mann's analysis would suggest, the rise of Urizen, the aloofness principle, cannot be distinguished from the formation of the Book which portrays him, in aloofly horrified terms, as aloof.
In our example, a distracted therapist may react aloofly to an appropriate approach behavior by the client.
With only a little ingenuity in one-sidedness an absolutely anthropomorphic deity could be put together, or a practically pantheistic, or a coldly and aloofly rationalistic (deity).
It was like some tableau of her life: Fielding the critic, aloofly watching a riot from the safe side of the fence" (315).
Zeus is not coldly humiliated but warmly humanized, not aloofly monumental but amusingly available.
This is the 'real' Henry James, sounding not quite the same as the poignantly speechless Henry of Colm Toibin or the more aloofly celibate Henry of David Lodge.
Yet despite being such a presence on stage, it was disappointing that the singer remained aloofly cool and did not converse more with the crowd throughout the 80 minute gig.
Although perched aloofly on a remote mountaintop and built without fortifications, Monte Alban, never invaded or sacked, did not exist in isolation but enjoyed brisk trade and cultural exchange with other great civilizations.