alterum non laedere

alterum non laedere

‘not to harm anyone’, the second of the three precepts upon which the Roman emperor Justinian said the law was based. See also HONESTERE VIVERE, ‘to live honestly’; and SUUM CUIQUE TRIBUERE, ‘to give each his due’.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Con respecto a esta <<responsabilidad juridica>>, el derecho canonico acoge la regla tradicional alterum non laedere, ya formulada por Ulpiano como una de las exigencias basicas de la justicia, en este texto del c.
(53) Dizemos "finalidade nuclear' porque no mencionado fragmento--da autoria de Ulpiano--tambem se afirma que a iurisprudentia visa que os cidadaos vivam honestamente (honeste vivere) e que nao lesem a outrem (alterum non laedere).
Roman jurists and the Roman legal community were committed to the identification of the delineation between what is "just and what unjust," and therefore the Institutes of Justinian and other sources of Roman law reflected an endeavor to "give each man his due right," and comprise "precepts" for all Romans "Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere" (17) Civil law recognizes certain cases in which one person having been injured by the fault or negligence of another is entitled to recover the damage which s/he has suffered by reason of such injury.
The Latin original is "Iuris praecepta sunt haec: honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere." The last clause is usually translated as "to give to each person his due." Digesta 1.1.10; Institutiones, I.
Part of the reason that the novella's commutative justice appears satisfying is that no one alive was truly harmed during the series of exchanges, fulfilling the basic precept of all transactions, alterum non laedere.
9 1.1.3: "honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere."