ambivalence


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In this research, we examined the ambivalence of their attitude towards unsafe acts that may be influenced by their cognitions of safety risks, their communications with their peer workers and foremen, and the organizational priorities over safety.
Research Question 1: Does ambivalence exist in the attitude of young people in China toward rich kids?
Ambivalence runs through Washington's ties with Saudi Arabia.
Medical evidence suggests that among living organ donors the prevalence of ambivalence is between 5% and 15%, with the ambivalence being so severe that up to 15% of individuals are not able to become donors.
Before you take offense at daring to question Texans' love of guns, note that in psychological terms, ambivalence doesn't mean opposition or rejection of guns or someone's right to tote one.
In this book, the concept of maternal ambivalence -- including extreme examples like Andrea Yates -- is explored through literature and illustrative case studies from Almond's private practice.
Pregnancy ambivalence can be understood as vague or conflicting altitudes about fertility intentions, and may be manifested in inconsistency between stated fertility desires and contraceptive behaviors.
Another potential dodge would be to deny that moral ambivalence exists.
It is just the other side of the client's ambivalence toward change, and is to be expected.
When viewed in just that one context, ambivalence is a luxury nurses can't afford.