AI

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Related to amelogenesis imperfecta: dentinogenesis imperfecta

AI

abbreviation for ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a term for a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that affect the dental enamel, occasionally in conjunction with other dental, oral and extraoral tissues.
Identification of a nonsense mutation in the amelogenin gene (AMELX) in a family with X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH1).
The treatment planning for patients with amelogenesis imperfecta is related to many factors: the age, socioeconomic status of the patient, the type and severity of the disorder, and the intraoral situation.
Osseous lesions in the maxilla can represent ossifying fibroma, fibrous dysplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, or osteogenesis imperfecta.
5) A number of subtypes of amelogenesis imperfecta exist, encompassing numerous patterns of inheritance and a variety of clinical manifestations (Figure 1).
La amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) es una anomalia dental de tipo estructural que se ha definido como "un grupo heterogeneo de condiciones heredadas caracterizadas por una formacion anormal del esmalte".
In addition, higher frequency of calculus accumulation was found also in children with amelogenesis imperfecta [Stewart et al.
The term, "regional odontodysplasia," is the most widely employed, yet other terms, such as odontogenesis imperfecta, odontogenic dysplasia, nonhereditary amelogenesis imperfecta, and ghost teeth are also found in the literature (REDMAN et al.
Asociaciones entre enfermedad renal y defectos de esmalte son reportadas, (19,20) incluso se sugiere a la hora del odontologo encontrar defectos como la amelogenesis imperfecta, establecer interconsulta con el nefrologo pediatra.
Differential diagnosis may include hypocalcified form of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, Kostmann's condition (conditions leading to early tooth loss), cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, tetracycline discoloration and staining of the teeth, vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-rickets.
Some of the affected persons had amelogenesis imperfecta.