amuse

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References in periodicals archive ?
We see it quite often at the bar: [as in] 'I want the Bartender's Choice but I only drink vodka,' " Morley says amusedly.
It was the idea that if you took those early 18th-century portrayals of harlequins in Watteau, or in Picasso's pink period--the Saltimbanques--you think about the despondency and abjection that these characters live in,' Condo says, before adding, amusedly, with respect to his own painting: 'At this point, there isn't even a circus anymore.
I get a rather shrill reminder that this is real, this is not a dream, when Federiko, the hotel's parakeet, looks at my cycling gear rather amusedly and cries: "Bonjour, bonjour, bonjour.
The power of patois is that it comes from the bottom up, without social sanction, often from special-interest subcultures (surfers, techies, druggies) or ethnic or sexual minorities, and always with an amusedly slant stance toward majority culture.
Hobbs's mobile rings, and he patiently and amusedly explains about Bangor-on-Dee, ensures that whoever is on the other end of the line will find the racecourse rather than the holiday resort.
Fayolle had been a sympathetic yet cautious observer of the emergence of "theory," often amusedly historicizing its presumed "novelty," and he recognized its contribution to scholarship without adopting its more radical methodological implications.
That may be one way of defining "assonance," as Frank amusedly agrees, but what Pilgrim Soul Productions' captivating "Educating Rita" does is get it triumphantly right.
While Gekko holds Rudy and watches amusedly, Bud eagerly signs documents that make him responsible for managing Gekko's portfolio.
Coetzee writes a detached, third-person and perhaps amusedly ironic "autrebiography" (to use his own term, adopted by Lenta, 2003), while every letter Head writes reflects her passionate, intelligent responsiveness to herself, her friends and her circumstances.
In keeping with Barker's source material, Jeff Buhler's screenplay mostly forgoes humor, although when Shields' gallery curator beholds an uncommercial frame and sighs, "Not holding my breath on that one--a tad too bleak," one thinks amusedly of the downbeat pic itself, whose fortunes certainly won't come in scant theatrical play.
As if just exiting this scene, the final hunter, holding a hooded falcon, stands hands on hip, gazing amusedly at his audience (fig.
Quickening her pace, Mylia was thinking, almost amusedly, I'm so hungry, I'm not going to die anymore