Anchor

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ANCHOR. A measure containing ten gallons. Lex, Mereatoria.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
There it collected numerous relics of the wreck-- iron utensils, anchors, pulley-strops, swivel-guns, an 18 lb.
He slipped his anchors, leaving them buoyed to be picked up in better weather.
The next morning, February 21st, at three o'clock, the furnaces began to roar; at five, the anchors were weighed, and the Resolute, powerfully driven by her screw, began to plough the water toward the mouth of the Thames.
Your journalist, whether he takes charge of a ship or a fleet, almost invariably "casts" his anchor. Now, an anchor is never cast, and to take a liberty with technical language is a crime against the clearness, precision, and beauty of perfected speech.
The vessel was slowly rising and now the anchor was beyond the blacks who faced me and several feet above their heads.
As I hinted before, this whalebone marquee was never pitched except in port; and on board the Pequod, for thirty years, the order to strike the tent was well known to be the next thing to heaving up the anchor.
You can't stop if you haven't got an anchor. And you'll need a bell."
Last of all, so far as concerned the Solomons, her anchor rumbled down and bit into the coral-sanded bottom of the harbour of Tulagi, where, ashore on Florida Island, lived and ruled the Resident Commissioner.
It was not worth while to anchor till they were sure of good ground.
On coming to anchor the captain went on shore, accompanied by Mr.
He proceeded to the banks of the Hudson, and looked about among the vessels moored or anchored in the river, for any that were about to depart.
I communicated to his majesty a project I had formed of seizing the enemy's whole fleet; which, as our scouts assured us, lay at anchor in the harbour, ready to sail with the first fair wind.