ancient

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Related to ancientness: Ancientry
See: antique, hereditary, obsolete, old, outdated, outmoded

ancient

having existed since before the time of legal memory (formerly fixed at 1189). See further ANCIENT DOCUMENTS, ACQUISITIVE PRESCRIPTION.

ANCIENT. Something old, which by age alone has acquired some force; as ancient lights, ancient writings.

References in periodicals archive ?
Adaptive ancientness of vascular plants to exploitation of low-nutrient substrates-a neobotanical overview.
The chapter usefully shows that the eighteenth-century debates over the ancientness of Ossian were in fact discussions of the contemporary national character of Scotland and its compatibility with modernity and with Britain.
13) This criterion has been chosen for its relative independency from literary considerations, for its intimate relationship with performance, and for its highly conservative nature indicating its ancientness.
Film critic Luca Pellegrini called the film a portrait of "today's Turkey in its most profound sense," adding, "It is this sense of ancientness terribly clashing with the present that the film [depicts] in an unforgettable way.
The Chinese tea industry has an approved list of registered terroir teas that have to comply with a set of precise requirements and prove the ancientness of their traditional characteristics in order to be included.
Some put the ancientness of the craft to more than 400 years old or more.
Walking around the ancientness and significance of the city cannot fail to affect you as you navigate the narrow cobbled alleyways of the old city.
In Shaw's work, for example, "the emphasis on Gaelic particularity and ancientness cannot be said to mark a clear departure from approaches to Gaelic that sought to translate it into a universal key.
Having finally evoked the ancientness of the problems which comparative literature brings to bear in its attempt to render comparative the study of the relations with philosophy or the sciences or the social sciences, I should perhaps, in closing, point out that genres are the ground where all the types of comparison, all the interdisciplinarities I mentioned earlier cross paths.
You are its harsh and sweetest word, whose ancientness shows in the blood pressing up in your eyes.
Foucault, 1984, notes with respect to anonymous medieval texts that "their ancientness, whether real or imagined, was regarded as a sufficient guarantee of their status" (109).