inhibitor

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Related to angiogenesis inhibitor: tumor angiogenesis
See: deterrent
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Moulton will extend our research efforts by exploring the role of angiogenesis inhibitors in cardiovascular disease.
We found that approximately three-quarters of Brazilian and Mexican oncologists point to reimbursement and/or budget-related restrictions as limiting the use of angiogenesis inhibitors," said Decision Resources Analyst Andreia Ribeiro, Ph.
Table 7: World 15-Year Perspective for Angiogenesis Inhibitors
As expected, such mice gained little weight when treated with angiogenesis inhibitors.
Several new agents in development seek to achieve this goal, including immune system modulators (such as MAbs and immunotoxins), cell-cycle inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, apoptosis inducers, and angiogenesis inhibitors.
Because angiogenesis inhibitors have the potential to treat multiple types of cancers with little systemic toxicity, their commercial impact may be vast there since cancer markets historically have tolerated high-price agents.
The ability of HDAC inhibitors to synergize with classic chemotherapeutic agents as well as newer signal transduction pathway modulators and angiogenesis inhibitors represents an increasingly appreciated concept meaning that in contrast to the current wave of targeted therapies, the utility of HDAC inhibitors could span multiple cancers and be used alongside a broad range of therapeutics.
Approval of these drugs essentially validated the concept of angiogenesis, and interest in developing angiogenesis inhibitors has increased.
However, opinion leaders have identified angiogenesis inhibitors to be the most promising for prostate cancer.
The report highlights commercial opportunities for angiogenesis inhibitors such as new therapeutic modalities in cancer, ophthalmic diseases, vascular skin diseases, and chronic inflammatory diseases.
What I find particularly exciting, given their different but complimentary mechanisms of action, is the notion of combining vascular targeting agents with angiogenesis inhibitors, and other standard treatments.