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animal

noun animans, beast, beast of burden, beast of the field, brute, brute creation, created being, creature, pet, wild being
Associated concepts: animals of a base nature, domestic annmals, wild animal
Foreign phrases: Animalia fera, si facta sint mansueta et ex consuetudine eunt et redeunt, volant et revolant, ut cervi, cygni, etc., eo usque nostra sunt, et ita intelligunnur quamdium habuerunt animum revertendi.Wild aniials, if they are tamed, and are accustomed to leave and return, fly away and fly back, as stags, swans, etc., are connidered to belong to us so long as they have the intention of returning to us.

ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
This study is the first to prospectively show an association between a high intake of animal protein and an increased risk of IBD, Dr.
In addition, plant and animal protein intakes may be associated with differences in dietary patterns and lifestyle factors.
The company looks for two things in overseas markets: a platform of animal production that allows for growth in that country or region and growing consumption of animal protein in that country or region.
If you want a protective diet, reduce your animal protein to one small serving a day.
And in wealthier nations--where heart disease, obesity, and other "diseases of affluence" run rampant--people are seeking healthier sources of animal protein.
The truth: Most Americans already eat about twice as much protein as they need, much of it high-quality animal protein.
To bring the highest profit to catfish producers, they found success in a diet of 28 percent protein with little or none of it animal protein.
POULTRY imported from the Netherlands has sparked concern among UK and Irish food safety bodies after samples were found to contain undeclared water and animal proteins.
The implication for people who eat high amounts of animal protein may be important: Specifically, over time, the net effect of a lower amount of bone formation would likely be a decrease in bone density.
By reducing the consumption of animal protein, probably the health of individuals could be maintained in a more sustainable manner, ie.
Breast cancer is associated with dietary fat (which is associated with animal protein intake) and inversely with age at menarche (women who reach puberty at younger ages have a greater risk of breast cancer).
In one study, diets rich in animal protein correlated with greater bone loss

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