Annexation

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Annexation

The act of attaching, uniting, or joining together in a physical sense; consolidating.

The term is generally used to signify the connection of a smaller or subordinate unit to a larger or principal unit. For example, a smaller piece of land may be annexed to a larger one. Similarly, a smaller document may be annexed to a larger one, such as a codicil to a will.

Although physical joining is implied, actual contact is not always necessary. For example, an annexation occurs when a country acquires new territory even though the new territory is not immediately adjacent to the existing country.

In the law of real property, annexation is used to describe the manner in which a chattel is joined to property.

Cross-references

Fixture.

ANNEXATION, property. The union of one thing to another.
     2. In the law relating to fixtures, (q.v.) annexation is actual or constructive. By actual annexation is understood every movement by which a chattel can be joined or united to the freehold. By constructive annexation is understood the union of such things as have been holden parcel of the realty, but which are not actually annexed, fixed, or fastened to the freehold; for example, deeds, or chattels, which relate to the title of the inheritance. Shep. Touch. 469. Vide Anios & Fer. on Fixtures, 2.
     3. This term has been applied to the union of one country, to another; as Texas was annexed to the United States by the joint resolution of Congress of larch 1, 1845., See Texas.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the phrase "at that day," Mann looks back at antebellum annexationism from a post-emancipation moment.
official sources), but it is preceded by a chapter tracing a breakneck journey through the previous 140 years, from Jefferson and Adams, through annexationism, jingoism, and racism (especially in envoys' reports).