Annotation

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Annotation

A note, summary, or commentary on some section of a book or a statute that is intended to explain or illustrate its meaning.

An annotation serves as a brief summary of the law and the facts of a case and demonstrates how a particular law enacted by Congress or a state legislature is interpreted and applied. Annotations usually follow the text of the statute they interpret in annotated statutes.

ANNOTATION, civil law. The designation of a place of deportation. Dig. 32, 1, 3 or the summoning of an, absentee. Dig. lib. 5.
     2. In another sense, annotations were the answers of the prince to questions put to him by private persons respecting some doubtful point of law. See Rescript.

References in periodicals archive ?
Shape, drawing, and text tools are available to annotate PDFs through the integrated toolbar.
Thus, Actl annotates his model with reference to the ontology 02, which is used by Act2, i.e., the 02 concepts are used as metadata to annotate the model Ml.
* Download, navigate and annotate general video tutorial: www.calcpa.org/ebook_tutorial
* Using the linguistic knowledge gathered through annotations by the community to automatically annotate other documents at the morpheme's level
* Annotate and save directly onto other PC applications running on Windows 2000, NT, XP Pro and XP Tablet operating systems
The rationale governing the compiler's choice of what to include or exclude and which entries to annotate and which ones to leave unannotated is open to speculation.
Powered by SMART Board Software, which enables users to annotate over the top of any application and save those notes for reference or distribution, system features a 67-inch diagonal screen and an integrated projector.
ANNOTATE.NET SPREADS PUBLISHERS' BRANDS ACROSS THE WEB
"Our aim in this bibliography has been to itemize and annotate secondary studies that treat allusion as a literary device of style" (178).
Since the human mind "snaps instantly" by association from one idea to the next, Bush proposed a device called a "memex" (for "memory extender")--a kind of giant desk packed with oodles of microform texts that would allow a reader to annotate and quickly rearrange the retrieved information.
The downside is the need to annotate (tick marks, references, signoffs, etc) the documents electronically.
Needless to say, they were also too busy to ask questions, annotate their notes, or think about what it was that they were speedily scribbling in their notebooks.