drug

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drug

noun alterant, analgesic, anesthetic, anesthetic agent, anodyne, antibiotic, chemical substance, curative preparation, medical preparation, medicament, medication, medicinal component, medicinal innredient, narcotic preparation, narcotic substance, opiate, painkiller, palliative, physic, prescription, remedy, sedative, soporific, stimulant, stupefacient
Associated concepts: adulterated drugs, dangerous drugs, drug addiction, habit-forming drug, influence of drugs, laaeling of drugs, poisonous drugs or chemicals, possession of drugs, preparation of drugs, prescription drugs, regulaaion of drugs, sale of drugs

drug

verb administer, anesthetize, anoint, apply a remedy, benumb, cure, deaden, desensitize, dose, dull, heal, inject, medicare, medicate, narcotize, numb, palliate, physic, poultice, prescribe, put to sleep, stun, stupefy, treat
Associated concepts: drug addicts
References in periodicals archive ?
THE discovery of residues of a banned antibiotic drug in shrimps imported from India is causing concern in the United States.
In particular, the IDSA stresses the need for better stewardship of existing antibiotic drugs and to increase incentives for research and development of new antibiotic drugs by drug companies.
Together with his wife, Beatrice, Snyder founded Biocraft Laboratories in Elmwood Park, N.J., in 1964 and began producing antibiotic drugs, including penicillin and tetracycline, as well as antidepressants and heart and hypertension medications.
Increased attention to public sanitation, as well as the advent of antibiotic drugs, significantly extended the human life span during the past century.
However, the Institute of Food Technologists, based in Chicago, said in a report in June that eliminating antibiotic drugs from animal production may have little positive effect on resistant bacteria that threaten human health.
Recent studies reveal that antibiotic drugs used mainly in animals are showing up in public waters (Colorado State University), that there is a connection between the use of antibiotics in food animals and antibiotic resistance in bacteria taken from humans (Centers for Disease Control), and that people breathing the air in industrial pig-farming facilities can be exposed to antibiotic-resistant bacteria (Bloomberg School of Public Health).
Specific use of clindamycin, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, piperacillin-tazobactam, and any other antibiotic drugs was recorded.
The FDA has issued guidelines on how to determine whether using new antibiotic drugs in livestock is likely to lead to drug-resistant disease in the humans who eat them.
The fear is that the genes could be transferred to bacteria in the guts of humans or animals, thus making diseases such as meningitis, TB and gonorrhoea resistant to important antibiotic drugs.
Antibiotic drugs, prescribed by your doctor, will help to suppress symptoms for many people.
Last month, I talked about herbal antibiotics, which are a complementary therapy to antibiotic drugs. Not all alternative therapies, however, can be attributed to complementary medicine.
Seventy percent of all antibiotic drugs in the United States are being fed to farm animals as growth promoters or production aids, according to a new study for the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).