apograph


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Related to apograph: Apocryphal
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His discovery near the end of the editing of a part of the apograph gave him a unique opportunity to check his restored readings of a portion of MY that had been damaged: "not one of the restitutions proposed by myself or by friends--stylistically plausible as the restitutions seemed--was confirmed by the discovery of the apograph" (p.
Cost i congiurati destiruti delli aiuti del papa et lei soccorsa da Milano, si fuggirono: et lei riprese la tenuta, ammazzo donne e fece il diavolo." In the Ricci apograph the expression "piena la fica" was altered at some point: "Piena" has a line drawn through it and "la fica" has be en scratched out (BCNF, fol.
(54.) An alternate theory for its place in the stemma would be as a descendant of the posited intermediary between the first family and the second and third families, but we would have to infer an additional apograph to account for the contamination of its reading in example 2.
The inscription is recorded with variations in a fragmentary fifteenth-century apograph of Cyriacus's letters dating from the 1440s now in Florence, Biblioteca Nazionale, Cod.
The collection presents a number of narratives according to V653, a nineteenth-century apograph of the venerable homiliary of Mus (copied in 1200-1202 from a ninth-century exemplar).
Four manuscripts were used in the preparation of the edition, the oldest being a ninth-century Nepalese palm-leaf manuscript and the others being twentieth-century apographs. The editor gives a fascinating description of the manuscripts along with a detailed account of the script showing variations of letters.
If the systematic transcription of the variants offered by the manuscripts (except minor orthographical peculiarities) is standard and desirable, the exhaustive incorporation of variants given by printed editions and seventeenth--and eighteenth-century apographs of extant codices is most arguable.
We are in the world of mouvance and variance, the latter encompassing the whole variety of scribal behaviour, including the extreme instability of linguistic, especially dialectal, features, tense-switching, lexical substitution, inconsistencies in multiple copies by the same scribe (what about apographs?), wilfully interventionist copying (Guiot), and so on.
According to commentators, it stems from the autograph manuscript, or else from the ones we might call apographs, or even from recent copies.
Manly and Edith Rickert in The Text of the Canterbury Tales (1940) that Chaucer never finished the sequence and certain tales and links, nor left clear and consistent indications for a full arrangement, which therefore had to be reconstructed or patched up posthumously from what pieces could be found, either in his own drafts and amended apographs or in copies he had let a few friends have in his lifetime; and that from both types of source, with their errors, omissions, and revisions, descend a varying number of independent traditions for most items, which M & R believed to be revealed by their collations of all the manuscripts, however occurring together or separately.