apostasize

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However, this central aspect of Rodrigues's worldview is exploded by his encounter with Ferreira, who urges Rodrigues to apostasize in order to spare the peasants from torture.
This invitation to Rodrigues to apostasize rather than permit the peasants to be martyred draws attention to Christ's weakness and the importance of his co-suffering with humanity, but it also of necessity calls attention to Christ's resurrection, in which, as Hart says, he leaves suffering as a "place of broken limits.
first whether sharia has any concept of equality under the law as we both know and have come to expect it, and second whether it has any concept of liberty of thought, expression, and religion, up to and including the right openly to apostasize without legal impediment or penalty, wherever one might happen to be?
For it is always wrong to apostasize from the one God and to enter into adulterous and superstitious worship of another god.
As for the second, the relevant question is whether Muslims would, if presented with the best arguments against theism, apostasize from Islam in significant numbers.
He also assumed a potential Anglo-American audience for the Irish-American novels that he reviewed when he criticized them for being overly nationalistic, or when he recommended them to "those who are pretending that Ireland is about to apostasize from the faith.
before civil rights and Vietnam caused him to apostasize.
But when the plague struck Essex about 664, causing King Sighere and his people to apostasize, and when it returned some years later to devastate the monastery at Barking, it is again unlikely that it exempted this large rural settlement, within the kingdom, and only some fifteen miles from Barking.
10) Earlier, the mob, who later will observe with amazement that distinction between unbelievers and the elect, add another testimony; a young man, Germanicus, resolutely rejects any inducement to apostasize and instead entices the wild beast to help him leave 'this unjust and lawless life', this time compelling the watching crowd 'to marvel at the nobility of the God-loving and God-fearing race of Christians' (3: 2 [Greek Text Omitted]).
Evelyn Waugh, bitter about the reforms, said, "I shall never, pray God, apostasize but churchgoing is now a bitter trial.
A person who formally and publicly apostasizes from the Catholic faith is, thereby, excommunicated (Canon 1364).