arbiter


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Arbiter

[Latin, One who attends something to view it as a spectator or witness.] Any person who is given an absolute power to judge and rule on a matter in dispute.

An arbiter is usually chosen or appointed by parties or by a court on their behalf. The decision of an arbiter is made according to the rules of law and Equity. The arbiter is distinguished from the arbitrator, who proceeds at his or her own discretion, so that the decision is made according to the judgment of a reasonable person.An arbiter may perform the same function as an umpire, a person who decides a controversy when arbitrators cannot agree.

Cross-references

Alternative Dispute Resolution; Arbitration.

arbiter

n. in some jurisdictions the name for a referee appointed by the court to decide a question and report back to the court which must confirm the arbiter's finding before it is binding on the parties.

arbiter

noun adjudicator, advisor, arbiter, arbitrator, determiner, disceptator, final authority, interagent, intercessor, intermediary, intermediate, intervener, mediator, moderator, negotiant, negotiator, prescriber, recommender, reconciler, referee
Associated concepts: arbitrament, final arbiter
See also: arbitrator, eyewitness, go-between, intermediary, judge, juror, referee, umpire

arbiter

see ARBITRATION.

ARBITER. One who, decides without any control. A judge with the most extensive arbitrary powers; an arbitrator.

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the desire to exclude from an arbitration the possibility of punitive damages or to provide an abbreviated statute of limitations may either invalidate the arbitration clause as in Graham Oil or leave residual claims to be tried in a court.(22) Such a strategy is shortsighted on the part of employers; it might result in not only taking at least part of the decision out of the hands of professional arbiters and putting it back into the hands of juries, but also compounding costs by necessitating both an arbitral and judicial forum for related claims.
Arbiter praised Healey's work and pointed out her "defined style" that includes curating and creating and reducing down a wardrobe and bringing it back up again.
"Besides, whatever decision the arbiter will issue would not bind Camcam, not being a party to the case.
Shah refused to comply with the arbiters' request to turn the phone on to check if it was being used to run a chess program, prompting tournament officials to expel the Indian player from the tournament.
Paul tells the Colossians: "Let the peace of God be the decider of all things (the umpire or referee) within your hearts." When things get fraught, when decisions need to be made as to right and wrong, or when we need either to respond or react, Paul advises that we consult God's peace as the final arbiter. God's peace will not countenance a reaction of anger, irritation, selfishness or dissent, but only a response of love.
My bet is that Dickie Arbiter is just madly jealous he can't make as much money as Burrell because, for all his years at the Palace, he was never privy to the kind of secrets Burrell was.
Having that one arbiter makes complete sense for our global economy, especially for developing countries.
allow architects/builders and their clients to agree on an arbiter from the American Arbitration Association to decide all disputes arising from the performance of the contract.
The Supreme Court may have the final word in legal matters, but when it comes to the Boy Scouts of America's policy against openly gay scouts and troop leaders, the court of public opinion may be the final arbiter. Now, in the latest round in what has become a national debate, Hollywood director and Scouts advisory board member Steven Spielberg has weighed in on the discriminatory policy with an exclusive statement to The Advocate.
Also serving on the board is Charles Rice, a University of Notre Dame law professor who once recommended that the pope be made a "supralegal arbiter" to pass judgment on the validity of U.S.
Specifically, Proser contends that Marlowe's "inability to achieve complete authoritative integration in his plays is due to a failure or insufficiency of 'executive ego'" - that "arbiter of artistic destiny" that "controls and shapes the imagination to larger ends" (6).