References in periodicals archive ?
Conservatives would, just as likely, argue that we cannot solve the civil wars of other nations and should not spend our blood and treasury unless doing so is vital to our national interests, and the fight is clearly winnable.
However, he does argue that Harris neglects a few "young writers and artists who stand clear of the mire he paints.
They further argue that fewer efforts are made to reunite African American foster children with their families of origin.
This is not, however, to argue that modernist thought was absent in Islam's intellectual history before the nineteenth century.
Patrick McCormick argues that religion belongs in our political discussions, but the religious values many politicians tout aren't shaping our public practices.
Hansen argues that while DeKalb abolished its black schools when forced by the courts, it created new largely black schools by racially motivated placement.
The author argues that the burden of proof for the safety and efficacy of some medical devices properly lies with the manufacturers of the devices and with the providers who use them.
Instead of political, economic and social forces causing this transformation of Northwestern Europe, the beginnings of "modernization," Hartman argues that it was a new pattern of social relations that established the necessary preconditions for these broader changes (31, 33).
The case does not explain why the IRS did not argue separate advances or what is necessary to prove one open account.
Carpenter and Bandow argue that, even if a war breaks out on the peninsula, it would not harm America's national interest: "Today, the Koreas are a peripheral interest at best.
Some forms of materialism argue that the mental phenomena in question do not even exist.
Harris's important and engaging study draws from family archives (including marriage contracts, accounts, inventories, letters), State Papers, Chancery cases, and over a thousand men's and women's wills to argue that aristocratic Yorkist and early Tudor women's responsibilities "constituted female careers" which, although "not professions in the modern sense," gave them considerable power over their families, servants, and communities (5).