arguer


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Instead of seeing innovative solutions that better fit the facts, arguers see only the facts that fit their favored solution.
If an arguer cannot perceive a reason, then it would be impossible for the acceptance of a standpoint be based on the strength of a reason.
For instance in (4), obviously, which was far more frequent than evidently, operates as a mitigator, lessening the forcefulness of the claim advanced by the arguer, otherwise strengthened by the repeated use of certainly.
Both desire argumentation that is sensitive to the arguer's need to express and the respondent's need to freely choose.
It is not even true that arguers can agree about whether they are arguing, since they might be having an argument about that.
Linkage of Commitments Premise: Generally, when an arguer is committed to A, it can be inferred that he is also committed to 6.
Rubinelli places the most emphasis on the first organon, largely because it is most applicable to rhetorical contexts--it guides the arguer to identify and select widely agreed premises.
La marche des Chretiens, qui se focalisait cette annee sur le rejet des resultats des elections presidentielles du 28 novembre 2011, durant lesquelles de nombreuses fraudes avaient ete constatees par les observateurs de l'Eglise catholique, avait ete interdite la veille par Andre Kimbuta, le gouverneur de Kinshasa, au motif que la demande "ne respectait pas la loi": toujours selon le gouverneur, le Conseil de l'apostolat des laics catholiques du Congo (CALCC), a l'origine de la demande de manifestation, "ne fait pas partie des organisations agreees"; pour arguer de sa bonne foi, il pretend meme avoir ete oblige de demander a l'archeveche de Kinshasa qui etait cette "structure qui se dit catholique".
The mistreated infant becomes the defensive arguer; the baby whose mom was attentive and supportive works through problems, secure in the goodwill of the other person.
MANY years ago, in the Eighties, when late-night radio was as stale and boring as it is now, there appeared a shining star named Allan Beswick, who was an expert arguer.