arrest the attention

See: engage, occupy
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References in classic literature ?
Although in a state of perfect repose, and apparently disregarding, with characteristic stoicism, the excitement and bustle around him, there was a sullen fierceness mingled with the quiet of the savage, that was likely to arrest the attention of much more experienced eyes than those which now scanned him, in unconcealed amazement.
She never puts it up, having the greatest reliance on her well-proved cloak with its capacious hood, but generally uses the instrument as a wand with which to point out joints of meat or bunches of greens in marketing or to arrest the attention of tradesmen by a friendly poke.
He urged the government to hold handicrafts exhibition inside and outside the country in an apparent attempt to arrest the attention of international traders, which would go a long way to enhance the business of ancient handicrafts.
In recent years, infographics have become a favorite tool of online marketers looking to arrest the attention of restless Web surfers with eye candy that offers the promise and at least the general shape of fast, numbers-driven epiphany.
Just after Ashwini's gold medal, it was Joseph Abraham's turn to arrest the attention of the audience in the 400m hurdles in a manner which has never been seen in recent times from an Indian male runner.
1 million and also pulling its best efforts to arrest the attention of global community towards providing their part of donations.
As Dent stated, he was determined to arrest the attention of the public by writing a biting poem.
The new MG company is hoping that its first estate model, the ZT-T, is about to arrest the attention of police forces looking for a new high speed patrol car.
In the pathetic passages, where he mourns over the loss of his daughter, his voice was wanting in melody, but then there were broken expressions very significant of emotion, and the passion of revenge was pourtrayed with an earnestness and fierceness that failed not to arrest the attention and secure the repeated plaudits of the house" (Saunders's Newsletter, and Daily Advertiser 10 Dec.
What impresses in Steane's criticism is the deft combination of wit and a disarmingly matter-of-fact approach that can arrest the attention immediately.