arrogated


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Related to arrogated: perpetrate, obviate, vitiate
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But if we allow the executive branch to have an unlimited exercise of its arrogated power, we can become a nation pockmarked with thousands of tax havens consisting of shopping centers, beach resorts, hospitals and other businesses.
It is frightening the way the extreme right has (balled, arrogated) aspects of the Constitution and warped them for their own agenda.
11 Congress, arrogated to itself the authority to mistreat and torture prisoners.
John Edwards has been particularly outspoken, stressing the vast powers that Ashcroft and Bush have arrogated to themselves, including the power to hold U.S.
It expands upon the emergency authority that many cities and states already have arrogated themselves for times of crisis, making explicit what powers public health officials will have.
The United States has arrogated to itself the right to attack pre-emptively any state or group perceived as a threat.
Following closely the progress of de Pisan's texts through a succession of English printers, translators, and editors (including, most notably, Caxton, Pynson, Thynne, and Pepwell), Summit argues convincingly that the position of cultural arbitress which de Pisan claimed for the woman writer was arrogated by these intermediaries to an emerging aristocratic community of male courtiers.
Second, in issuing the proposed regulations, the Board of Public Works has arrogated to itself the effective authority to make tax law for the State of Maryland.
'It is submitted that the President clearly arrogated unto himself a power not expressly granted to him by the sovereign people, either through the Constitution or through legislation-the power of judicial review-which power in fact belong to a separate and co-equal branch of the government, the Judiciary,' Trillanes' camp argued.
The ruling was driven by "purely political considerations", she added in the House of Advisors (Upper House), noting that the European Court, which has arrogated the right to give its opinion on "a purely political issue" that falls within the competence of the UN, ignores the developments of the national cause as well as tremendous efforts made by Morocco to reach a final solution to this artificial conflict.
MP Maurice Vellacott's remarks that Supreme Court Justice Beverly McLachlin has arrogated to herself God-like prerogatives (May 11, 2006) is to the point.
The problem is that these powers, properly the province of state and local government in most instances, are being arrogated by the executive branch in Washington.