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And Camulodunum, the name hopefully ascribed to the fort at Outlane also happens to be the name of the far better-known Roman city of Colchester in Essex
But in a religious decree carried by Saudi websites on Monday, the clerics ruled the series blasphemous because the superheroes of its title are based on the 99 attributes ascribed to Allah in the Koran.
In an interview with him, tThe Saudi 'Sharq' daily ascribed to the Iraqi diplomat in Riyadh, Ma'ad al-Ubaidi, saying that Shiite sectarianism, as a political movement, started a Yemeni Jew named Abdullah Bin Saba', in cooperation with the Persians to split the Moslems.
They ascribed the company's revenue dip of February mostly to end of rush orders, which boosted the company's January revenue.
The rise can mainly be ascribed to higher commission income, the company said.
A fair system would ensure actual sources are ascribed for undesired email.
Perhaps for that reason, the majority of Mitterrand's Parisian Grands Projets get very short shrift, while the glazed pavilions at Parc Andre Citroen (a City of Paris undertaking) are wrongly ascribed to him and much cited.
Although a variety of reproductive complications have been ascribed to compounds with androgenic or estrogenic properties, little attention has been directed to the potential consequences of such exposures to the genetic quality of the gamete.
The Republican Party I ascribed to was one which believed in an equal playing field regardless of race, religion, sex or sexual orientation.
Among ancient societies, for example, the eruption of a volcano might be ascribed to the anger of a god; among contemporary societies, it would more likely be ascribed to geothermal forces.
The range of weight loss ascribed to these medications is 2-10 kg, said Dr.
Michael Slusser's accurate and careful English translation brings together for the first time works ascribed to or associated with Gregory Thaumaturgus, the third-century bishop of Neocaesarea.