assent


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Assent

An intentional approval of known facts that are offered by another for acceptance; agreement; consent.

Express assent is manifest confirmation of a position for approval. Implied assent is that which the law presumes to exist because the conduct of the parties demonstrates their intentions. Mutual assent, sometimes called the meeting of the minds of the parties, is the reciprocal agreement of each party to accept all the terms and conditions in a contract.

assent

noun acceptance, accord, accordance, acquiescence, adsensio, affirmance, affirmation, agreement, approbation, approval, compliance, concord, concordance, concurrence, confirmation, consent, consentaneity, endorsement, permission, ratification, recognition, sanction, submission, willing consent, willingness
Associated concepts: legal assent
Foreign phrases: Nemo videtur fraudare eos qui sciunt et consentiunt.No one is considered as deceiving those who know and consent to his acts. Non refert an quis assennum suum praefert verbis, aut rebus ipsis et factis. It is immaterial whether a man gives assent by his words or by his acts and deeds.

assent

verb accede, accept, accord, acknowledge, acquiesce, adnuere, adsentari, agree, allow, approve, comply, concede, concur, confirm, conform to, consent, embrace an offer, endorse, express concurrence, favor, give consent, homologate, permit, ratify, recognize, sanction, subscribe to
Associated concepts: assent by acts, assent by gestures, assent by silence, express assent, implied assent, judicial assent, mutual assent
Foreign phrases: Qui non prohibet id quod prohibere potest assentire videtur.He who does not forbid what he is able to prevent, is deemed to assent. Qui tacet consennire videtur, ubi tractatur de ejus commodo. He who is silent is deemed to consent.
See also: abide, accede, acceptance, accordance, acknowledgment, acquiescence, adduce, admit, affirmance, agree, agreement, allow, approval, approve, bear, capitulation, certify, charter, coincide, compliance, comply, compromise, concede, concession, concordance, concur, confirm, confirmation, conformity, consent, corroborate, defer, deference, endure, franchise, grant, indorsement, leave, let, license, obey, pass, permission, permit, promise, ratification, sanction, stipulate, submit, subscribe, subscription, suffer, understanding, vouchsafe, yield

ASSENT, contracts. An agreement to something that has been done before.
     2. It is either express, where it is openly declared; or implied, where it is presumed by law. For instance, when a conveyance is made to a man, his assent to it is presumed, for the following reasons; cause there is a strong intendment of law, that it is for a person's benefit to take, and no man can be supposed to be unwilling to do that which is for his advantage. 2. Because it would seem incongruous and absurd, that when a conveyance is completely executed on the part of the grantor, the estate should continue in him. 3. Because it is contrary to the policy of law to permit the freehold to remain in suspense and uncertainty. 2 Ventr. 201; 3 Mod. 296A 3 Lev. 284; Show. P. C. 150; 3 Barn. & Alders. 31; 1 Binn. R. 502; 2 Hayw. 234; 12 Mass IR. 461 4 Day, 395; 5 S. & R. 523 20 John. R. 184; 14 S. & R. 296 15 Wend. R. 656; 4 Halst. R. 161; 6 Verm. R. 411.
     3. When a devise draws after it no charge or risk of loss, and is, therefore, a mere bounty, the assent of the devisee to, take it will be presumed. 17 Mass. 73, 4. A dissent properly expressed would prevent the title from passing from the grantor unto the grantee. 1 2 Mass. R. 46 1. See 3 Munf. R. 345; 4 Munf. R. 332, pl. 9 5 Serg. & Rawle, 523; 8 Watts, R. 9, 11 20 Johns. R. 184. The rule requiring an express dissent, does not apply, however, when the grantee is bound to pay a consideration for the thing granted. 1 Wash. C. C. Rep. 70.
     4. When an offer to do a thing has been made, it is not binding on the party making it, until the assent of the other party has been given and such assent must be to the same subject-matter, in the same sense. 1 Summ. 218. When such assent is given, before the offer is withdrawn, the contract is complete. 6 Wend. 103. See 5 Wend. 523; 5 Greenl. R. 419; 3 Mass. 1; 8 S. R. 243; 12 John. 190; 19 John. 205; 4 Call, R. 379 1 Fairf. 185; and Offer.
     5. In general, when an assignment is made to one for the benefit of creditors the assent of the assignees will be presumed. 1 Binn. 502, 518; 6 W. & S. 339; 8 Leigh, R. 272, 281. But see 24 Wend. 280.

References in periodicals archive ?
We, as a parliament, have looked at the reasons given by the president on why he withheld his assent to the electoral bill.
The ministry, in turn, moved a summary to the prime minister, who advised the president to give his assent.
Assent is a service that allows researchers to log in to highend research facilities and web-based resources with a single, university-assigned username and password.
Now let's consider what makes testimonial assent to the unseen justified.
The bill was reported back with amendments on May 4, 2015 and received Royal Assent on May 28, 2015.
If the President withholds assent for thirty days without giving reasons, the bill shall be deemed to have been so signed.
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President Pranab Mukherjee on Sunday gave his assent to the Ordinance on sexual assault which was approved by the Union Cabinet two days ago.
com)-- Assent Publishing announces the launch of the second edition of How To Understand Economics in 1 Hour by Marshall Payn just in time for the 2012 elections.
Epictetus' conception of the psychology of human action is strongly in line with the mainstream position on the subject that we find in early Stoic sources (1), a position that considers every human action as a sequence of three distinct mental events: an impression (phantasia), an act of assent (synkatathesis (2)) to that impression, and an impulse (horme) to act (3).
The marked ethical import of Cartesian epistemology takes the form of a deontological, non-consequentialist view of error: epistemic agents are praised/blamed when they fulfill/flout the duty to not assent to ideas that are less than clear and distinct.