assimilate

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The 43 international (community) schools have assimilated 8% of students and 3.
Though they disagree about much, he says, they all reject the idea that thinking about things can be assimilated to being merely affected by things, and the idea that acting intentionally can be assimilated to an ability to affect things.
Majid bin Ali Al-Nu'aimi revealed that the Ministry of Education has assimilated this year 119 students with special needs into government schools namely: 83 mentally incapacitated and Down Syndrome, 7 physical disability, 12 visually-impaired, 15 aural impairment and 2 autistic students under the Ministry's plan to assimilate students with special needs who are capable to study in public schools.
1 : to become or cause to become part of a different group or country <She was completely assimilated into her new country.
Clearing out old digestive matter and "feeding the fire," they allow not only food, but also life experiences to be assimilated and digested.
The bigger debate, then, is about more than veils; it's about the extent to which Muslims have (or haven't) assimilated into British society, and what to do about it.
As Filipino immigrants came to America, their children quickly assimilated and identified themselves first as Americans and second as Filipinos, knowing that they didn't want to duplicate the fragmentation of their former country.
Immigrant-rights groups say the English-only movement, gaining momentum in recent months, paints all immigrants as reluctant to be assimilated by their adopted country.
There is even a special Q&A section at the end of each chapter to insure that the information within that chapter has been properly assimilated and understood.
The other two titles, "Women's History Review" (4x) and "Women's Writing" (3x), will be assimilated into T&F Group's Arts and Humanities and Social Science sections, respectively.
If we take Anglo-Protestantism as the root of American national identity, we have to consider European Catholicism, which we all consider fully assimilated into whatever the American identity may be.
However assimilated and successful, though, Baptiste is unwilling to sever his connection to black America.