Birth

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BIRTH. The act of being wholly brought into the world. The whole body must be detached from that of the mother, in order to make the birth complete. 5 C. & P. 329; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 344 6 C. & P. 349; S. C. 25 E. C. L. R. 433.
     2. But if a child be killed with design and maliciously after it has wholly come forth from the body of the mother, although still connected with her by means of the umbilical cord, it seems that such killing will be murder. 9 C. & P. 25 S . C. 38 E. C. L. R. 21; 7 C. & P. 814. Vide articles Breath; Dead Born; Gestation; Life; and 1 Beck' s Med. Jur. 478, et seq.; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 438; 7 C. & P. 814; 1 Carr. & Marsh. 650; S. C. 41 E. C. L. R. 352; 9 C. & P. 25.
     3. It seems that unless the child be born alive, it is not properly a birth, but a carriage. 1 Chit. Pr. 35, note z. But see Russ. & Ry. C. C. 336.

References in periodicals archive ?
We requested figures for the number of medically assisted births and found that not all health boards correlated figures for how many women had deliveries involving ventouse, forceps or episiotomies.
Trial of instrumental delivery in theatre versus immediate caesarean section for anticipated difficult assisted births. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2012, Issue 10.
In Syria, for instance, said Philippa King of the Australian mission in the UN, "96 percent of mothers enjoyed assisted births" before violence broke out, but this number "has fallen even below 25 percent" since the conflict started.
A day later and by now sobbing in agony, the 33-year-old teacher was told to wait another 12 hours because "assisted births" could not be carried out at night at Dewsbury Hospital.
This was followed by another wait due to a policy of not allowing assisted births at night, then further problems with staff and equipment not being available.
"There is a complete lack of regulation of assisted births especially regarding surrogate mothers," Koursoumba said, adding that this was "a huge gap which could lead to trafficking of children."
In 1999, a total of 6,546 surgically assisted births were recorded in Wales, compared to 8,446 a decade later.