receive

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Related to at the receiving end: worse for wear, so much for, not a chance, give a shot, be damned

receive

(Acquire), verb accept, accipere, assume, be given, capere, catch, collect, come by, derive, draw, earn, gain, gather, get, inherit, make, obtain, pick up, pocket, procure, realize, reap, secure, seize, take, take in, take possession, win
Associated concepts: contructively received, receive process, receive stolen property

receive

(Permit to enter), verb absorb, accept, admit, adopt, allow, allow entrance, approve, embrace, give entrance, grant asylum, include, induct, initiate, install, let in, let through, permit, shelter, show in, take in, tolerate, usher in
Associated concepts: receive into evidence, receive into the record
See also: accept, congregate, draw, embrace, endure, extract, gain, hold, inherit, instate, obtain, partake, possess, procure, realize, reap, suffer, take, tolerate

TO RECEIVE. Voluntarily to take from another what is offered.
     2. A landlord, for example, could not be said to receive the key from his tenant, when the latter left it at his house without his knowledge, unless by his acts afterwards, he should be presumed to have given his consent.

References in periodicals archive ?
PESHAWAR -- Islamabad were at the receiving end of defeats by both Wapda and Pakistan Army in Group 'A' as the 14th National Women's Volleyball Championship began here at the Pakistan Sports Board Coaching Centre on Wednesday.
Summary: California [United States], June 13 (ANI): For Twitter users who were at the receiving end of the age restriction-based ban by the company, here's some good news.
The people at the receiving end of these agents' crimes will not be happy if they get off scott free.
During the first trials of the system in July, the voice sounded more "computerized" than a telephone voice, Herman says, because of the way the words were digitized and then translated at the receiving end. "It sounded a little better than the computer voice in the movies that speaks in a monotone," Herman says.