atrocity


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atrocity

noun abomination, abuse, act of ferocity, atrocious crime, atrocitas, barbarity, deed of savagery, ferocity, flagitious villainy, flagitiousness, flagrancy, gross offense, heinousness, holocaust, infamy, inhumanity, iniquity, malevolence, maltreatment, monstrosity, nefariousness, nefas, res atrox, savagery, truculence, victimization, villainy, wannonly wicked conduct, wickedness
Foreign phrases: Patria potestas in pietate debet, non in atrocitate, consistere.Paternal power should consist of affection not of atrocity.
See also: abuse, cruelty, delinquency, misconduct, misdeed, vice, wrong
References in periodicals archive ?
Putting conspiracy theories aside, it seems that the Manchester atrocity will advantage some leading politicians, I believe, and that is utterly despicable as far as I am concerned.
The code, signed by 102 countries, also contains a political pledge to support timely and decisive council action against atrocity crimes.
Among those killed in the worst single atrocity of the Troubles was a woman pregnant with twins.
No serious historian of the Vietnam War disputes that the way American forces fought the war contributed to an atmosphere of atrocity.
All imagery used throughout Routine Atrocity is presented life-size and to scale, shown side-by-side with the actual real weaponry.
The USIP, a conflict management-oriented body funded by Congress, is due to produce a report on atrocity prevention in July, Claes noted.
The Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention encourages individuals, groups and organizations to apply technology-based solutions to the most significant challenges surrounding atrocity prevention.
The atrocity prevention efforts of the United Nations and its partners play a vital role in helping to reduce the number of crises.
The Army's Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute's MARO Mass Atrocity Response Operations: A Military Planning Handbook defines MARO as, "a contingency operation to halt the widespread and systematic use of violence by state or non-state armed groups against non-combatants.
Sections examine massacre and atrocity in ancient and pre-modern eras and colonial eras, memory and contested narratives and the dynamics of mass killings and atrocity in modern times.
In Making Sense of Mass Atrocity, Mark Osiel argues that the appropriate legal responses to mass atrocities ought to be derived from a rich understanding of how it is that such atrocities occur.
By institutionalizing the coordination of atrocity prevention, the United States ensures: (1) that US national security apparatus recognizes and is responsive to early indicators of potential atrocities; (2) that departments and agencies develop and implement comprehensive atrocity prevention and response strategies in a manner that allows "red flags" and dissent to be raised to decision makers; (3) that US increases the capacity and develop doctrine for its foreign service, armed services, development professionals, and other actors to engage in the full spectrum of smart prevention activities; and (4) that US agencies are optimally positioned to work with her allies in order to ensure that the burdens of atrocity prevention and response are appropriately shared.