attack

(redirected from attacks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
References in classic literature ?
Numerical weakness comes from having to prepare against possible attacks; numerical strength, from compelling our adversary to make these preparations against us.
Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.
Therefore, a prince who has a strong city, and had not made himself odious, will not be attacked, or if any one should attack he will only be driven off with disgrace; again, because that the affairs of this world are so changeable, it is almost impossible to keep an army a whole year in the field without being interfered with.
"Then we must try to find some reason why he attacked Lady Arabella."
If that were so, how was it that Mademoiselle had been attacked after?
It is impossible to attack the state of his faculties: there is no case to go into court with, so far.
But often a pause so gained lengthened out until it evolved into a complete cessation from the attack. And before more than one of the grown dogs White Fang's snarl enabled him to beat an honourable retreat.
Still, to betray hesitation or fear would be to discover his actual weakness, and to invite attack. He assumed, instantly, therefore, a belligerent tone; ordered the squaws to lead the horses to a small grove of ashen trees, and unload and tie them; and caused a great bustle to be made by his scanty handful; the leaders riding hither and thither, and vociferating with all their might, as if a numerous force was getting under way for an attack.
"And suppose that they were to attack the upper part of the balloon, what would you do?
Still it was a ghastly sight, and one from which we were glad to escape; indeed, I never remember anything of the kind that affected me more than seeing those gallant soldiers thus put out of pain by the red-handed medicine men, except, indeed, on one occasion when, after an attack, I saw a force of Swazis burying their hopelessly wounded /alive/.
"Alas," said the Policeman, "why did I not attack the sober one before exhausting myself upon the other?"
He reported that his regiment had been attacked by French cavalry and that, though the attack had been repulsed, he had lost more than half his men.