attaint


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attaint

to pass judgment of death or outlawry upon a person; see ATTAINDER.

ATTAINT, English law. 1. Atinctus, attainted, stained, or blackened. 2. A writ which lies to inquire whether a jury of twelve men gave a false verdict. Bract. lib. 4, tr. 1, c. 134; Fleta, lib. 5, c. 22, Sec. 8.
     2. It was a trial by jury of twenty-four men empanelled to try the goodness, of a former verdict. 3 Bl. Com. 351; 3 Gilb. Ev. by Lofft, 1146. See Assize.

References in periodicals archive ?
210 (describing the punishment for attaint as "severe").
According to Johnson (1976), in the Jurassic carbonate platforms the representatives of the suborder Lagenina attaint the maximum diversity in the middle and inner part of the platforms.
Mais la morphologie du writ of attaint se modifiera assez rapidement.
(48) See generally Hale, supra note 33, at *251--54 (discussing the historical application of the common law pleas of autrefois convict and autrefois attaint).
Intercultural education- can attaint its aims if it lived/ practiced and not only pronounced on the discursive level.
at 76-77 (detailing the potential penalties for attaint, or rendering a false verdict).
The volume closed by two letters in prose, "dell'amica all'amico." According to the cataloguer, "they are without doubt by Madeleine and concern private quarrels (dissidi [?] privati) and petty affairs of the court." The remaining unidentified incipits are: the opening poem of the cycle of chansons ("Quand vostre cueur d'amour attaint"), and the closing espitre ("Ores que je suis loing de vous mon serviteur").
That is beside his economic rights to attaint he needed and reasonable expenses.
Rather, even in The Troublesome Raigne King John is a complicated figure and he dies acknowledging his faults: But in the spirit I cry unto my God, As did the Kingly Prophet David cry, (Whose hands, as mine, with murder were attaint) I am not he shall buyld the Lord a house.
The civil court, for instance, virtually ignored the law of attaint and convicts were able to sue, to hold property and to retain earnings.
Notwithstanding that amounts awarded by the jury were at varying times subject to control--especially by a writ of attaint for erroneous assessment--there was no need to articulate the function of damages, which seem, in practice, to have been awarded to serve a number of purposes.
4, c.23 asserted, "after judgment given in the courts of our lord the King, the parties and their heirs shall be thereof in peace, until the judgment be undone by attaint or by error." In 1598, late in the reign of Elizabeth, the case of Finch v.