author


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author

(Originator), noun architect, auctor, begetter, causer, composer, contriver, creator, deviser, discoverer, effecter, fabricator, founder, generator, inaugurator, initiator, innovater, institutor, introducer, inventor, maker, manufacturer, occasioner, organizer, parent, prime mover, producer, sire
Associated concepts: copyright
Foreign phrases: Culpa tenet suos auctores.Fault binds its own authors.

author

(Writer), noun compiler, composer of a literrry work, drafter, essayist, literary person, man of letters, person who writes, scriptor, verse maker
Associated concepts: copyright, plagiarism
See also: architect, compose, derivation, elicit, engender, generate, invent, make, maker, originate, undersigned
References in classic literature ?
Be that as it may, the author was brought an infant into this valley, and all his first impressions were here obtained.
But the author indulged his recollections freely when he had fairly entered the door.
The author has elsewhere said that the character of Leather-Stocking is a creation, rendered probable by such auxiliaries as were necessary to produce that effect.
Beginning in Boston, they were continued in a Boston suburb, on the shores of Lake George, in a Western New York health resort, in Buffalo, in Nahant; once, twice, and thrice in New York, with reversions to Boston, and summer excursions to the hills and waters of New England, until it seemed that their author had at last said his say, and he voluntarily lapsed into silence with the applause of friends and enemies alike.
His opinions were always impersonal; and now as their manner rather than their make has been slightly tempered, it may surprise the belated reader to learn that it was the belief of one English critic that their author had "placed himself beyond the pale of decency" by them.
There are some things related in the narrative which will be sure to appear strange, or perhaps entirely incomprehensible, to the reader; but they cannot appear more so to him than they did to the author at the time.
It is not, perhaps, necessary to enumerate so many reasons why the author of the Scottish Novels, as they were then exclusively termed, should be desirous to make an experiment on a subject purely English.
The idea of this contrast was taken from the ingenious and unfortunate Logan's tragedy of Runnamede, in which, about the same period of history, the author had seen the Saxon and Norman barons opposed to each other on different sides of the stage.
It seemed to the author, that the existence of the two races in the same country, the vanquished distinguished by their plain, homely, blunt manners, and the free spirit infused by their ancient institutions and laws; the victors, by the high spirit of military fame, personal adventure, and whatever could distinguish them as the Flower of Chivalry, might, intermixed with other characters belonging to the same time and country, interest the reader by the contrast, if the author should not fail on his part.
That, the author declares, is one of the principal aims of this book; it is one of the principal aims of his life.
But the author is far from regarding as accomplished, the task which he has voluntarily imposed on himself.
While the Author cannot but feel the full force of the compliment thus conveyed to him, he ventures to suggest that these contentions may arise from the fact, that Mr.