Graft

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Related to autologous graft: allogeneic graft, autologous tissue
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Graft

A colloquial term referring to the unlawful acquisition of public money through questionable and improper transactions with public officials.

Graft is the personal gain or advantage earned by an individual at the expense of others as a result of the exploitation of the singular status of, or an influential relationship with, another who has a position of public trust or confidence. The advantage or gain is accrued without any exchange of legitimate compensatory services.

Behavior that leads to graft includes Bribery and dishonest dealings in the performance of public or official acts. Graft usually implies the existence of theft, corruption, Fraud, and the lack of integrity that is expected in any transaction involving a public official.

GRAFT. A figurative term in chancery practice, to designate the right of a mortgagee in premises, to which the mortgagor at the time of making the mortgage had an imperfect title, but who afterwards obtained a good title. In this case the new mortgage is considered a graft into the old stock, and, as arising in consideration of the former title. 1 Ball & Beat. 46; Id. 40; Id. 57; 1 Pow. on Mortg. 190. See 9 Mass. 34. The same principle has obtained by legislative enactment in Louisiana. If a person contracting an obligation towards another, says the Civil Code, art. 2371, grants a mortgage on property of which he is not then the owner, this mortgage shall be valid, if the debtor should ever acquire the ownership of, the property, by whatever right.

References in periodicals archive ?
DePuy's stand-ins for autologous grafts include bio-compatible calcium phosphate bone void fillers in either fast-set putty form (Norian SRS) or strips (chronOS).
This study demonstrates that amnion and MNC-enriched PRGF gel, after minimal handling, are promising candidates as noninvasive sources for autologous grafts in correction of congenital soft tissue defects.
PRF exudates contain good amount of growth factors (transforming growth factor (TGF)-[beta]1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-[beta], and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)), matrix glycoprotein's (fibronectin and vitronectin), and proteins specialized in increasing cell attachment to biomaterial impregnation, rinsing surgical sites, hydration of graft materials, and for storage of autologous grafts. [2,7,8]
For the purposes of this publication, the focus will be on the most common material used: autologous grafts. Autologous material has very little tissue reaction, with a very low risk of erosion, and is usually easily harvested.
Although various types of autologous grafts such as arteries, veins and muscles have been recommended, an ideal conduit has not yet been described.
The use of autologous grafts exhibits the highest success rate, and autogenous block grafts are considered the gold standard because their osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive properties maximize the success of graft incorporation [2, 3].
Among the several techniques that can be employed for limb sparing, substitution of the neoplastic region by allogeneic or autologous grafts is the most commonly used technique (EHRHART et al., 2013).
(9) Allografts may be a good alternative to autologous grafts because they eliminate the need for an additional incision, eliminate donor-site morbidity, and decrease operating time.
In vascular traumas, which are not appropriate for primary repair, autogenous grafts are preferred for vessel continuity.14,15 Autologous grafts are preferred for their short-term and longterm patency ratios (98%) and their resistance to infection.16 Synthetic grafts (PTFE and Dacron grafts) also have good results when autologous grafts are not available.11

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