bacchanalia


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See: debauchery
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The introduction of wine at the Mad Tea Party equates it with the ancient Greco-Roman Bacchanalia, a festival held in honour of the god of wine and madness.
A raft of non-fiction books--A Return to Modesty by Wendy Shalit (1999), Unprotected by Miriam Grossman (2006), Unhooked by Laura Sessions Stepp (2007), Hooked by Joe McIlhaney (2008), and many others--have made the empirical case against the ravages of today's youthful bacchanalia. But only Wolfe has taken us inside the skulls of the participants, leading to his greatest creation to date, a character as fully realized as, say, Emma Bovary (whom, not coincidentally, Wolfe uses as a plot device).
"Livy's Comic Narrative of the Bacchanalia." Helios 16.2: 119-42.
The movie does feature inordinate amounts of sex, crudeness, and lewdness, but the blatant bacchanalia serves a purpose; like Hieronymus Bosch's vivid depiction of the agonies of hell in The Garden of Earthly Delights (oil-on-wood; 1504), we need to see the full degree to which Belfort and his company flaunted their wealth in order to understand the depths of their depravity.
Over at Galea's establishment, cheese plays a major role in weekly brunching bacchanalia. He said: "We celebrate the joy of cheese in our weekly brunch, where we feature over 150kg of artisanal cheeses.
Summary: "Bacchanalia" a group art exhibition showcasing the works by established Lebanese artists was inaugurated over the weekend at the IXSIR Winery in Batroun.
Canvases such as The Bacchanalia on Andros are shown alongside works by Watteau, Manet and Picasso.
From 10 million barrels per day in 1950, global consumption soared to 77 million in 2000, a half-century bacchanalia of fossil fuel burning.
It's nice to see a house party that features a music-themed game of charades and cabs called for the kids, instead of a drunken bacchanalia.
ALL ALONG, BROOK HAD PLANNED to emulate the ancient tradition by which "a satyr-play concluded a trilogy of tragedies, performed by half-human half-animal creatures, the actors donning horns and hairy goat-legs" to displace "the tragic action [with] humor, licentiousness and wine": the Oedipus audience would see a form of bacchanalia. After Brook's Monday pep talk, the company were allowed to don for the first time elaborate costumes made of golden paper, with matching masks, and invited to improvise "a joyous atmosphere." They "gyrated, danced and cavorted"--all but one, who stood dead center.
The subsuming of history and geography under the "rock" and the distantness of France may urge us to forecast the Orient as a once-again legendary destination ripe with occult and bacchanalia friendly to our sen sory desires.
To me, however, Betsy is an impediment to the expected bacchanalia and, possibly, to the life of this article itself.