company

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Company

An organization of individuals conducting a commercial or industrial enterprise. A corporation, partnership, association, or joint stock company.

company

n. any formal business entity for profit which may be a corporation, a partnership, association or individual proprietorship. Often people think the term "company" means the business is incorporated, but that is not true. In fact, a corporation usually must use some term in its name such as "corporation," "incorporated," "corp." or "inc." to show it is a corporation. (See: business)

company

(Assemblage), noun aggregation, assembled body, assemblée, assembly, attroupement, caucas, coalition, conclave, conference, confluence, conflux, congregation, convention, convergence, convocation, crowd, group, ingathering, league, meeting, mustering, societas

company

(Enterprise), noun association, body corpooate, business, business establishment, coetus, combination, commercial enterprise, concern, confederacy, consociation, copartnership, corporate body, corporation, establishment, federation, firm, grex, guild, institute, joint concern, partnership
Associated concepts: affiliated company, company union, construction company, corporation, holding company
See also: alliance, assemblage, assembly, association, body, business, collection, concern, corporation, enterprise, firm, house, organization, personnel, syndicate

company

an association of persons formed for the purpose of some business or undertaking, which has a legal personality separate from that of its members. A company may be formed by charter, by special Act of Parliament or by registration under the Companies Acts. The liability of members is usually (but not always) limited by the charter, Act of Parliament or memorandum of association. A company may be a public limited company (PLC or plc), in which event its shares may be transferred freely among, and owned by, members of the public. All limited liability companies that are not public limited companies are private companies, denoted by the term Ltd. While companies are owned by their members (i.e. shareholders), they are managed by a board of directors. Historically, the duties owed by the board are fiduciary in nature and owed to the company rather than the shareholders. Companies are the major instrument for economic and financial growth and development in the Western world. A limited company encourages trade to the extent that in the event of insolvency the owners are liable only to the extent of their unpaid share capital. The limited company is a legal person in its own right and is sued in place of the owners or directors.

A company may be limited by shares or, in the case of a private company, by guarantee. Since the Companies Act 1980, it is no longer possible to create a company limited by guarantee and having a share capital in the UK. A company limited by guarantee is a company that has the liability of its members limited by the memorandum of association to such an amount as the members may undertake to contribute to the assets of the company upon its being wound up. A company limited by shares is a company having the liability of its members limited by the memorandum of association to the amount, if any, unpaid on the shares respectively held by them.

COMPANY. An association of a number of individuals for the purpose of carrying on some legitimate business.
     2. This term is not synonymous with partnership, though every such unincorporated compass is a partnership.
     3. Usage has reserved this term to associations whose members are in greater number, their capital more considerable, and their enterprises greater, either on account of their risk or importance.
     4. When these companies are authorized by the government, they are known by the name of corporations. (q.v.)
     5. Sometimes the word is used to represent those members of a partnership whose names do not appear in the name of the firm; as, A.B & Company. Vide, 12 Toull. n, 97; Mortimer on Commerce, 128. Vide Club; Corporation; Firm; Parties to actions; Partnership.

References in periodicals archive ?
Was the Vermont Teddy Bear Company wrong to continue selling the bears?
The Vermont Teddy Bear Company seemed to have the right marketing strategies in place for continued growth as of 2004.
Simon Burke, chairman of Hamleys, which is buying the remaining assets of troubled bear retailer The English Teddy Bear Company
Everyone loves a teddy bear - and we couldn't resist the selection from the Blue Foot Bear Company. Our favourite has to be Horny Devil (below), part of a cheeky X-rated range.
You could bear all and show your loved ones how much you care with a cute teddy from the Blue Foot Bear Company.
She also then established The Annette Funicello Teddy Bear Company, had her autobiography published and her life story was produced as a TV movie, “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes: The Annette Funicello Story.”
The Blue Foot Bear Company has produced a limited edition Raddington Bear which sports Nike trainers, trendy sun glasses and a record bag for a new street cool image.
Lynne Sangster, owner of the Edinburgh Bear Company in South Queensferry, sells dozens of gollies a week at prices ranging from pounds 11 to pounds 100.
But as his popularity grew he became a mascot for Wolverhampton's successful bid for City status - prompting Mr Burke to create the Burkey Bear Company with financial backing from other local firms.
Lynne's Edinburgh Bear Company has now opened a second shop just off the Royal Mile in Edinburgh.
He joined his creator Gary Burke (top)managing director of the Burkey Bear Company, Roy Lyness, managing director of Business Growth Resources, and Carl Jarvis (right) of Internet Marketing Services, who built the fully interactive entertainment-based website www.burkeybear.com.
As a result the Burkey Bear Company was formed - complete with an interactive Internet site, Burkey Bear merchandise and a fan club.