porter

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PORTER. The name of an ancient English officer who bore or carried a rod before the justices. The door-keeper of the English parliament also bears this name.
     2. One who is employed as a common carrier to carry goods from one place to another in the same town, is also called a porter. Such person is in general answerable as a common carrier. Story, Bailm. Sec. 496.

References in classic literature ?
They'd a deal better ha' taken his beer," returned Dan reflectively.
Naturally the flood of beer wrought demoralisation.
His persistent demands would have ended, at Dan's instigation, in a regimental belting which in all probability would have killed him and cut off the supply of beer, had not he been sent on special duty some fifty miles away from the Cantonment to cool his heels in a mud fort and dismount obsolete artillery.
As to that," answered Musqueton, puzzled how to get out of the difficulty, "I must confess that to me beer is as disagreeable as wine is to the English.
His manner became more and more lofty every instant; then he arose and after finishing off the beer at one draught he advanced majestically to the door of the compartment where the wine was.
Go in, then, Grimaud," said Musqueton, handing him the beer pot and gimlet.
She came back, with some bread and meat and a little mug of beer.
The bread and meat were acceptable, and the beer was warming and tingling, and I was soon in spirits to look about me.
But, there were no pigeons in the dove-cot, no horses in the stable, no pigs in the sty, no malt in the store-house, no smells of grains and beer in the copper or the vat.
Then the big boys used to drop in and take their seats, bringing with them bottled beer and song books; for although they all knew the songs by heart, it was the thing to have an old manuscript book descended from some departed hero, in which they were all carefully written out.
During the pauses the bottled- beer corks fly rapidly, and the talk is fast and merry, and the big boys--at least all of them who have a fellow-feeling for dry throats--hand their mugs over their shoulders to be emptied by the small ones who stand round behind.
And away goes the pounding and cheering again, becoming deafening when old Brooke gets on his legs; till, a table having broken down, and a gallon or so of beer been upset, and all throats getting dry, silence ensues, and the hero speaks, leaning his hands on the table, and bending a little forwards.