particle

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Related to beta particle: Gamma particle

particle

noun atom, bit, component part, crumb, cutting, fragment, grain, granule, hint, mite, modicum, moiety, molecule, morsel, piece, pittance, point, scintilla, snippet, speck, spot, suggestion, trace
See also: constituent, element, iota, minimum, modicum, part, portion, scintilla
References in periodicals archive ?
A Riso TL/OSL-DA-20 unit equipped with a [sup.90]Sr beta source was used to perform beta particle irradiations and TL measurements.
662 keV, a medium energy, and beta particles. Each radionuclide that
Dozens of radioactive elements emit an alpha or beta particle, sometimes both.
In 1914, however, the English physicist James Chadwick (1891-1974) showed that this was not true of beta particles. They came off in a continuous range of energies, from a sharply defined maximum down to zero.
For example, the trace contaminant bismuth-214 decays into polonium-214 by emitting a single beta particle, but the process sometimes dumps enough energy into the bismuth atom to force the ejection of one of the atom's orbital electrons.
In the two-neutrino decay process, one neutron in the nucleus of the isotope selenium-82 decays into a proton, neutrino and electron (beta particle).
The amount of power generated by the converter depends on the thickness of the nickel foil and the converter itself, because both affect how many beta particles are absorbed.
As beta particles do not penetrate human skin, so long as you don't eat it, tritium is harmless to humans.
specifications: full leather personal dosimeter optimally stimulable capacity to register hp effective dose 10 of 10 usv 10 sv, beta particles and 200 to 250 msv for usv neutrons.
It can detect alpha and beta particles when fitted with a very thin window.
Beta radiation is a particulate radiation consisting of high-speed electrons, which are rapidly attenuated by biological tissues (2 MeV beta particles have a range of only 1cm in water) (LOMMATZSCH, 1977; REBHUN, 1990; KIRWAN et al., 2003; DONALDSON et al., 2006).
The particles that are emitted are either alpha particles, beta particles or gamma rays.