bibliophilic


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Related to bibliophilic: Bibliophily, book-lover
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His pride and joy, and one of the best collections in America, he enjoyed showing it off to visitors, inviting them to become part of the bibliophilic public to which he belonged.
Like Frances Stark, he strikes a bibliophilic pose--the pieces are modest in scale and must be "read," their power emerging gradually, and in part through compositional reptition.
They also provide a private window into the hearts, minds and personal lives of two very remarkable and dedicated bibliophilic custodians.
Best of all, rather than being regarded as bibliophilic wastrels or commercial speculators, we might be thought of as public benefactors.
From a bibliographic and bibliophilic perspective, the much more congenial, and arguably more influential, French medieval farces themselves have only been getting the modern dusting off and editorial attention they deserve in the last few decades: for example, Andre Tissier's multivolume Recueil de farces, 1450-1550 for Droz.
The slightly chilly nuances of the description of his business in the High Street of the Old Town may have struck readers of the Letter that followed, which describes William Blackwood's spacious bookshop/publishing house/literary salon at 17 Princes Street in the New Town as a roof-lit reservoir of bibliophilic bonhomie: "The only great lounging book-shop in the New Town of Edinburgh is Mr Blackwood's.
Kirkman's system is a significant innovation in the emergence of the dramatic author as a category: at the moment of an emergent bibliophilic culture interested in the collection of printed drama,(11) he becomes absorbed in discovering/producing authors who have a discernible, definable corpus--writers whose plays can be grouped.
A bibliophilic perfectionist, he was not the type of man who wished to transform society.
This gives the work an undertone that rubs against its bibliophilic luxe.
From a financial point of view they were, of course, a disaster; a huge quantity of books and manuscripts suddenly unloaded into an already depressed market, but it makes a great bibliophilic tale, well told.
The sector of the bibliophilic world that has Locker-Lampson and especially Wise at its point of origin is rife with these sorts of figures--only two copies of this book survive, only one copy of that book survives--and they rarely stand up to close scrutiny.
The Huntington Library and Art Gallery, constructed in an idyllic setting of California, would be a permanent monument to his bibliophilic vision and wealth.