bind

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bind

(Obligate), verb adstringere, burden, charge, confirm, conscript, constrain, drive, encumber, exact, force, impose, indent, indenture, obligare, oblige, pledge, promise, require, sanction, set a task, warrant
Associated concepts: bind a deal, binding authority, binding instruction, binding receipt, binding transaction
Foreign phrases: Nuda ratio et nuda pactio non ligant aliquem debitorem.Naked intention and naked promise do not bind any debtor. Quodque dissolvitur eodem modo quo ligatur. A thing is unbound in the same manner that it is made binding.

bind

(Restrain), verb block, check, compel, confine, encumber, fetter, fix, hamper, hinder, immobilize, inhibit, limit, repress, secure, shut in
Associated concepts: bind over
See also: add, affix, amalgamate, annex, attach, cement, combine, confine, connect, consolidate, constrain, constrict, contain, detain, enclose, enforce, engage, estop, fetter, hamper, handcuff, hire, impose, imprison, join, limit, pledge, press, promise, restrain, restrict, trammel, vow

bind

to impose legal obligations or duties upon a person or party to an agreement.

TO BIND, BINDING, contracts. These words are applied to the contract entered into, between a master and an apprentice the latter is said to be bound.
     2. In order to make a good binding, the consent of the apprentice must be had, together with that of his father, next friend, or some one standing in loco parentis. Bac. Ab. Master and Servant, A; 8 John. 328; 2 Pen. 977; 2 Yerg. 546 1 Ashmead, 123; 10 Sergeant & Rawle, 416 1 Massachusetts, 172; 1 Vermont, 69. Whether a father has, by the common law, a right to bind out his child, during his minority without his consent, seems not to be settled. 2 Dall. 199; 7 Mass. 147; 1 Mason, 78; 1 Ashm. 267. Vide Apprentice; Father; Mother; Parent.
     3. The words to bind or binding, are also used to signify that a thing is subject to an obligation, engagement or liability; as, the judgment binds such an estate. Vide Lien.

TO BIND, OR TO BIND OVER, crim. law. The act by which a magistrate or a court hold to bail a party, accused of a crime or misdemeanor.
     2. A person accused may be bound over to appear at a court having jurisdiction of the offence charged, to answer; or he may be bound over to be of good behaviour, (q. v.) or to keep the peace. See Surety of the Peace.
     3. On refusing to enter into the requisite recognizance, the accused may be committed to prison.

References in classic literature ?
Well, then, be it so; but loving me does not bind you too much.
A promise binds me not to repeat the information that I have received.
I insist on knowing what binds you to that man," I said.
Mothers do a deal of this sort of thing, unseen, unthanked, but felt and remembered long afterward, and never lost, for this is the simple magic that binds hearts together, and keeps home happy.
And it is to Alfred the Great that we owe this slender thread which binds our English literature of to-day with the literature of a thousand years ago.
Who ever drinks to fullness, in him wine becomes violent and binds together his hands and feet, his tongue also and his wits with fetters unspeakable: and soft sleep embraces him.
My present obligation merely binds me to tell you--in strict confidence, mind
It is but one more link to the strong chain that binds us together.
Ah, my worthy friends," he exclaimed, "what progress we should make if on earth we could throw off some of that weight, some of that chain which binds us to her; it would be the prisoner set at liberty; no more fatigue of either arms or legs.
We have to consider what binds together two simultaneous sensations in one person, or, more generally, any two occurrences which forte part of one experience.
I saw one at the Vienna exhibition, which binds with a wire," said Sviazhsky.
If I do not understand - and I do not, sir' - said Sissy, 'what your honour as a gentleman binds you to, in other matters:' the blood really rose in his face as she began in these words: 'I am sure I may rely upon it to keep my visit secret, and to keep secret what I am going to say.