birth

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birth

(Beginning), noun animation, arrival, creation, debut, embarkation, establishment, genesis, inauguration, inception, incipience, incunabula, infancy, introduction, nascency, onset, origin, origination, ortus, vitalization
Associated concepts: ante natus

birth

(Emergence of young), noun arrival, childbirth, delivery, nativity, parturition, vivification
Associated concepts: birth certificate, birth control, issue, pretermission
Foreign phrases: Non nasci, et natum mori, paria sunt.Not to be born, and to be born dead, are the same.

birth

(Lineage), noun ancestry, bloodline, derivation, descent, extraction, heredity, heritage, inheritance, line, line of descent, parentage, provenance, succession
Associated concepts: birth certificate, legitimacy
Foreign phrases: Qui in utero est pro jam nato habetur, quoties de ejus commodo quaeritur.He who is in the womb is regarded as already born, whenever a question arises for his benefit.
See also: ancestry, bloodline, creation, derivation, descent, family, genesis, inception, lineage, nascency, nationality, onset, origin, origination, outset, parentage, race, source, start

BIRTH. The act of being wholly brought into the world. The whole body must be detached from that of the mother, in order to make the birth complete. 5 C. & P. 329; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 344 6 C. & P. 349; S. C. 25 E. C. L. R. 433.
     2. But if a child be killed with design and maliciously after it has wholly come forth from the body of the mother, although still connected with her by means of the umbilical cord, it seems that such killing will be murder. 9 C. & P. 25 S . C. 38 E. C. L. R. 21; 7 C. & P. 814. Vide articles Breath; Dead Born; Gestation; Life; and 1 Beck' s Med. Jur. 478, et seq.; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 438; 7 C. & P. 814; 1 Carr. & Marsh. 650; S. C. 41 E. C. L. R. 352; 9 C. & P. 25.
     3. It seems that unless the child be born alive, it is not properly a birth, but a carriage. 1 Chit. Pr. 35, note z. But see Russ. & Ry. C. C. 336.

References in periodicals archive ?
Birth intervals increased with female age, probably reflecting detrimental effects of senescence.
These equity-based programs such as skilled birth attendant, skilled prenatal care and modern contraceptive provision can aim to improve neonatal health in disadvantaged subgroups, including habitants of rural areas, people of lower economic status, illiterate mothers, mothers with history of abortion/stillbirth, and mothers with risky birth interval and delivery in very young or old ages.
Variables The units or the level of the variables Independent Categorical variable, 1 if the child is a variables multiple birth and 0 if a singleton Multiple/twin Birth interval Length of time, in months, between the current birth and the prior birth Birth order Number of previously born children Child's sex Categorical variable, 0 if the child is male and 1 if female Mother's age Age of mother in years Mother's Height for age standard deviations from the height reference median (as calculated by DHS) Education Highest level of education attended by the mother.
6) and among those who had had a birth interval of less than two years (-0.
Birth interval refers to the number of years or months between successive pregnancies.
The first birth interval was significantly longer for the Humli women at 3.
Mothers with short birth intervals were more likely to suffer long-term illnesses in later life, and had a 20% higher death rate after the age of 50.
He cites earlier research showing that women with very long or short birth intervals are more likely to be unmarried and have less education than other women.
The second is a measure of education during birth intervals.
Important to measure would be things like a woman's age at first marriage, number of years in marriage, length of postpartum infecundable period when she cannot conceive, and length of birth intervals, all set against the countdown from menarche to menopause.
In separate regressions we examined whether married women, young or older women, women with lower education, women with longer birth intervals, or Healthy Start (nonwelfare) women were different in the changes in their outcomes during the managed care implementation period.
The preceding birth interval and the survival status of the older siblings are the most important demographic determinants of neonatal and post-neonatal mortality.